The Importance of Minerals in our Horses’ Diets

Minerals in our horses’ diets are essential in order for the body to work properly – for growth, for utilization in muscles, nerves, and turning the food our horses eat into energy. Most of all they are essential for maintaining a state of health and well-being.

Different minerals are required by the horse’s body in different amounts and many are synergistic. They are classified in groups of trace minerals, major minerals and minerals.

No nutrient or minerals can alter the horse’s well-being single-handedly.  Nutrients and minerals need to be balanced. While a “healthy” diet will provide all the essential minerals we find it hard-pressed to find a diet suggested for horses that does not include GMO, GE, and foods heavily processed with chemicals, artificial flavors, colors and preservatives. Add that to grains that are heavily herbicided, pesticided and fertilized — its a sad commentary on what we consider ‘healthy’ for our horses today.

What might be considered adequate minerals intake will include the following minerals as listed in this chart from webmd.com …

Macrominerals

Major minerals
Mineral Function Sources
Sodium Needed for proper fluid balance, nerve transmission, and muscle contraction Table salt, soy sauce; large amounts in processed foods; small amounts in milk, breads, vegetables, and unprocessed meats
Chloride Needed for proper fluid balance,stomach acid Table salt, soy sauce; large amounts in processed foods; small amounts in milk, meats, breads, and vegetables
Potassium Needed for proper fluid balance, nerve transmission, and muscle contraction Meats, milk, fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes
Calcium Important for healthy bones and teeth; helps muscles relax and contract; important in nerve functioning, blood clotting, blood pressure, blood regulation, immune system health Milk and milk products; canned fish with bones (salmon, sardines); fortified tofu and fortified soy milk; greens (broccoli, mustard greens); legumes
Phosphorus Important for healthy bones and teeth; found in every cell; part of the system that maintains acid-base balance Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, milk, processed foods (including soda pop)
Magnesium Found in bones; needed for making protein, muscle contraction, nerve transmission, immune system health Nuts and seeds; legumes; leafy, green vegetables; seafood; chocolate; artichokes; “hard” drinking water
Sulfur Found in protein molecules Occurs in foods as part of protein: meats, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, legumes, nuts

Trace minerals (microminerals)

The body needs trace minerals in very small amounts. Note that iron is considered to be a trace mineral, although the amount needed is somewhat more than for other microminerals.

Trace minerals
Mineral Function Sources
Iron Part of a molecule (hemoglobin) found in red blood cells that carry oxygen in the body; needed for energy metabolism Organ meats; red meats; fish; poultry; shellfish (especially clams); egg yolks; legumes; dried fruits; dark, leafy greens; iron-enriched breads and cereals; and fortified cereals
Zinc Part of many enzymes; needed for making protein and genetic material; has a function in taste perception, wound healing, normal fetal development, production of sperm, normal growth and sexual maturation, immune system health Meats, fish, poultry, leavened whole grains, vegetables
Iodine Found in thyroid hormone, which helps regulate growth, development, and metabolism Seafood, foods grown in iodine-rich soil, iodized salt, bread, dairy products
Selenium Antioxidant Meats, seafood, grains
Copper Part of many enzymes; needed for iron metabolism Legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains, organ meats, drinking water
Manganese Part of many enzymes Widespread in foods, especially plant foods
Fluoride Involved in formation of bones and teeth; helps prevent tooth decay Drinking water (either fluoridated or naturally containing fluoride), fish, and most teas
Chromium Works closely with insulin to regulate glucose levels Unrefined foods, especially liverl, brewer’s yeast, whole grains, nuts, cheeses
Molybdenum Part of some enzymes Legumes; breads and grains; leafy greens; leafy, green vegetables; milk; liver

Other trace nutrients known to be essential in tiny amounts include nickel, silicon, vanadium, and cobalt.

Truth be told, in ancient mines one will find 78+ minerals – all of which are needed in order to keep our horses in a healthy state of homeostasis.  Compare the chart above with this chart from Window Peak Minerals, NV:  (far cry from what we’re led to believe is all that is necessary)

Aluminum Al Holmium Ho Rhodium Rh
Antimony Sb Hydrogen H Rubidium Rb
Arsenic As Indium In Ruthenium Ru
Barium Ba Iodine I Samarium Sm
Beryllium Be Iridium Ir Scandium Sc
Bismuth Bi Iron Fe Selenium Se
Boron B Lanthanum La Silicon Si
Bromine Br Lead Pb Silver Ag
Cadmium Cd Lithium Li Sodium Na
Calcium Ca Lutetium Lu Strontium Sr
Carbon C Manganese Mn Sulphur S
Cerium Ce Magnesium Mg Tantalum Ta
Cesium Cs Mercury Hg Tellurium Te
Chlorine Cl Molybdenum Mo Terbium Tb
Chromium Cr Neodymium Nd Thallium Tl
Cobalt Co Nickel Ni Thorium Th
Copper Cu Niobium Nb Thulium Tm
Dysprosium Dy Nitrogen N Tin Sn
Erbium Er Osmium Os Titanium Ti
Europium Eu Oxygen O Tungsten W
Fluorine F Palladium Pd Uranium U
Gadolinium Gd Phosphorus P Vanadium V
Gallium Ga Platinum Pt Ytterbium Yb
Germanium Ge Potassium K Yttrium Y
Gold Au Praseodymium Pr Zinc Zn
Hafnium Hf Rhenium Re Zirconium Zr

Key to above mineral chart —

Green = essential element for some or most plants
Red = essential trace mineral for humans*
Fuchsia = essential trace mineral for livestock and pets**
Black BOLD = macro mineral essential to both humans and animals
Underlined Black = electrolyte essential to all animal life
Plain Black = unconfirmed application to human and/or animal nutiritional needs

* Chlorine and Fluorine are noted in their elemental gaseous state. In Window Peak Trace Minerals these elements combine with other elements to produce the minerals Chloride and Fluoride. Fluorite, a crystal resembling a translucent rock is yet another compound of Fluorine. Also note that Oxygen is also required by animal life, but is a gas and therefore not a mineral. Besides, we all need it in “macro” amounts.

** Livestock and pets also need the minerals listed in red.

All of them in a montmorillonite clay base to help bind and carry toxins out of the body.
Now, think of the feral horse that lives out in the wild … what do they need? What do they get? Depending on the area in which they live and graze, they’ll get pretty much all of what is listed above. How do they get it?  By grazing forages and eating or licking dirt. Simple.

What does YOUR horse get?  Take a look at the ingredient list on your supply of minerals. I can guarantee that you won’t find any like you’ll find from Window Peak, NV.  And so many people moan about their horses licking rocks or eating dirt. Why do they do that?

Because they NEED MINERALS!

So, where can you GET Window Peak Minerals?

Well, that’s easy!  You can get them from me. I get a small percentage of each ‘sale’; I am NOT a distributor.  But when I found NATURAL HORSE MINERALS and tried them out I swore I’ll NEVER CHANGE to another AND I have to tell others about them simply because I love helping horses and their humans.  Here’s where you can order them: http://www.thepenzancehorse.com/wordpress/?p=85

Or, simply write to me at gwen.santagate@gmail.com and request an order. It’s as simple as that.

Once you switch or add these minerals to your horses’ diets you’ll never switch back to anything else.

I promise.

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Healing Hearts …

wemustcreate

RAW HONEY KILLS ALL

The health benefits of raw, unprocessed honey are well known, but in Australia, scientists recently made a startling discovery – that one particular, obscure type of honey is capable of killing just about everything scientists throw at it, including some of the worst bacteria known to man.

The findings were published in the European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (June 2009), and could hold special significance at a time when many of the world’s top antibiotics are failing, especially against resistant “superbugs.”

The honey in question in known as Manuka Honeywhich is produced in New Zealand and also goes by the name of jelly bush honey … ”

READ MORE HERE:  http://www.realfarmacy.com/obscure-honey/#!prettyPhoto

Acupressure for Horses Explained

By Casie Bazay, NBCAAM

Acupressure, which uses finger pressure on specific points on the body, has been around for thousands of years, and is believed to actually pre-date acupuncture (which uses needles to stimulate those points instead).  Both acupressure and acupuncture are a part of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) and are used all over the world now on humans and animals alike.

In order to understand how acupressure works, you must first understand how TCM views the body.  In TCM, the body is not seen as being made up of many various parts, but instead as one whole, integrated system.  The mind, body, and spirit are all connected as a single entity.  A life force, known as Chi (Qi) flows throughout the body via meridians, or internal pathways. There are said to be 12 major meridians, each one named for the internal organ with which it is associated.

Chi has two major aspects:  Yin and Yang, which are opposite, but mutually dependent on one another.  If the body is healthy, Yin and Yang are considered to be perfect balance.  In an unhealthy body, Yin and Yang are out of balance, and physical symptoms often arise if the imbalance is not soon resolved.  Acupressure can help to restore the balance of Yin and Yang within the body.

Each if the 12 Major Meridians contains acu-points, usually at specific anatomical locations.  When an imbalance occurs in the body, Chi is said to be obstructed.  By applying pressure on specific acu-points, Chi can be released to flow freely throughout the body once again, and the balance of Yin and Yang can be restored.

In recent years, Western Medicine has sought to understand acupressure and explain it in terms more comprehensible to the Western World.  Although there are some aspects of acupressure and TCM that are nearly impossible to translate into Western terms, many Western scientists believe that acupressure (or acupuncture) stimulates the body’s ability to produce endorphins (natural painkillers).

Acupressure is becoming much more accepted in the Western world and is often used in conjunction with Western medical treatments.  Some effects of acupressure include:

  • reducing pain
  • relieving muscle spasms
  • resolving injuries more quickly by removing toxins and increasing blood supply
  • enhancing mental clarity
  • releasing natural cortisone to reduce swelling
  • building the body’s immune system

Acupressure Technique

When applying acupressure to your horse, typically the forefinger or thumb is used.  Light pressure is usually preferable and  is tolerated by most horses.  Extreme sensitivity in an acu-point usually indicates excess Chi in that area.  Pressure is usually applied to each selected acu-point for 10-20 seconds or until a release, or visible sign such as licking/chewing, head-lowering, yawning, etc., is shown by the horse.

To see how acupressure is applied go here:  https://youtu.be/3iZwb6iXCO4

Acupressure for Horses Explained

The Cushings Horse

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While most are advised to feed the Cushings horse a specialized formulated no sugar/low carb feed, I believe that doing so can actually be detrimental to your horse’s health. Processed feeds are known to be a causative factor in Insulin Resistance and EMS.

My own Cushings horse doesn’t get any processed feeds. He gets RAW vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds as well as an organic, whole feed.   He’s shedding out nicely, has a good attitude, good energy and is putting on the healthy weight and muscle he needs.

He also gets organic Chaste Tree Berry along with a daily homeopathic regime proven to help resolve the Cushings condition 

Check out what Dr. DePaolo has to say about it.

 

LYME DISEASE

THIS POST is in response to a question I receive very often .. what can I use to help take care of LYME DISEASE in my horse (dog, me) ….

ticks
Lyme Disease and Homeopathy

by Stephen Tobin, DVM

I am a holistic veterinarian in Connecticut and have treated several hundred cases of Lyme disease in the past five years. After trying various homeopathic preparations, with only limited success, I found that Ledum in a 1M potency is about as close as you can get in a specific cure. I have used it in dogs, cats, and horses, and it does not seem to matter whether it is a recent infection, a year old, treated or untreated — they all respond curatively. I have not had a single case that did not improve.

While I do not treat human beings, some of my clients with animals suffering from Lyme disease have taken Ledurn 1M for their own Lyme disease infections, after seeing the positive result with their animals. The feedback I have gotten is all positive. I have told numerous naturopaths and homeopathic MDs about Ledum. One homeopathic MD runs titers on all his Lyme disease patients, both before and after treatment with Ledum, and has found that there is a constant decline in titer after Ledum.

For treatment, I give one pellet of Ledum 1M three times a day for three days. I have been using Borrellia burgdorferi 60X nosode, a homeopathic preparation, as a preventative for Lyme disease in dogs. I give orally one dose daily for one week, then one dose a week for one month, then one dose every six months. In the past four years, i have had only two dogs out of over five hundred on this regimen that might have contracted Lyme disease, both of which readily cleared with Ledum.

While there is a canine vaccine for Lyme disease, I haven’t found it very effective. One vet who uses it extensively told me she feels it provides protection for about a third of the dogs receiving it. I have seen a number of Lyme disease cases in dogs starting five to six weeks after vaccination (these also resolve with Ledum). In an April 1993 letter, the Cornell Veterinary School Diagnostic Lab wrote about a study of dogs with a clear history and diagnosis of Lyme disease: 56% had antibodies as determined by the western blot test only against the vaccine, with another 32% having antibodies against the vaccine and spirochete itself. In other words, more than half had Lyme disease because of the vaccine and almost a third had Lyme disease despite the vaccine.

One breeder told me that before she started using the nosode, at least one dog and one family member would contract Lyme disease each year, but since using the nosode as a preventative (for the family and dogs), they have not had one case. Her husband was bitten twice by deer ticks last summer and developed a rash the size of a dime, whereas in the past, when he was bitten by a deer tick and subsequently developed Lyme disease, the rash was “twice the size of a half dollar.”

I know a number of naturopaths who use Borrellia burgdorferi nosode as part of their treatment protocol for Lyme disease. One client, to whom I have given the nosode for her horse, took it herself and told me that the Lyme disease she had been suffering from for several years cleared up.

GLUTEN … the secrets.

GLUTENFREE

The unrelenting surplus of excess sugars; unsprouted, hybridized grains; and other nutritionally bankrupt, processed foods in the standard American diet has simply devastated the gut. Of particular concern is gluten, which evidence increasingly points to as a prime driver of leaky gut syndrome. When foods with gluten are consumed, the body undergoes an inflammatory response and eventually releases the protein — zonulin — that unlocks the epithelial tight junctions and keeps the gates of the gut wide open as long as it circulates in the blood. (1)

The biggest problem is that foods with gluten hide right in plain sight, often going overlooked and even something being promoted as healthy food options. In reality,foods that contain gluten damage the gut and can cause even further problems, particularly for people with gluten sensitivity. So what’s the deal with gluten, what are these foods with gluten we should avoid and what role does zonulin play in gluten’s negative side effects? Let’s find out.

READ MORE::

Why Gluten Is Bad for Your Gut and All the Sneaky Ways It Gets Into Your Diet (Under Pseudo-Names)

The horse as he is

GREAT articles on the COGNITIVE HORSE!

The Cognitive Horse

Monti Lucretili Free-roaming horses in Italy, 2010 – Pic by José De Giorgio-Schoorl

How many people actually really know the horse as he is? This is the more important question. A lot of people think that in nature horses are reactive animals, always in an emotive inner state, searching for their leader to have guidance. False. Horses become highly reactive/emotive due to human breeding, management and activities. In nature horses are cognitive/emotional animals. They are thinking animals. Each their own balanced individual, capable of belonging to something bigger as a herd.

But what does cognition really mean? Cognition usually refers to the cognitive mechanisms involved in learning, memory, perception, decision-making and other. Cognitive ethology starts from the animal as sentient being. In the same way, the zooanthropological philosophy starts from considering animal as dialogical subject and not as passive object.

Equitation, modern or classical, more or less “natural”, using negative or positive reinforcement, has…

View original post 1,130 more words

Dandelions!

Dandelion

What an awesome weed!  BUT WAIT …  “weed?” you say. “I’ve spent hundreds of hours trying to get RID of all the dandelions in my yard! and now you’re telling me how awesome it is !?”

YEP.  Sure am!

Take a look at the health benefits of Dandelions from organicfacts.net …


Health Benefits of Dandelions

The health benefits of dandelions include the following:

Bone Health: Dandelions are rich in calcium, which is essential for the growth and strength of bones, and they are rich in antioxidants like vitamin-C and Luteolin, which protect bones from age-related damage. This inevitable damage is often due to free radicals, and is frequently seen as bone frailty, weakness, and decreased density.

Liver Disorders: Dandelions can help the liver in many ways. While the antioxidants like vitamin-C and Luteolin keep the liver functioning in optimal gear and protect it from aging, other compounds in dandelions help treat hemorrhaging in the liver. Furthermore, dandelions aid in maintaining the proper flow of bile, while also stimulating the liver and promoting digestion. Proper digestion can reduce the chances of constipation, which in turn reduces the risk of more serious gastrointestinal issues.

Diabetes: Dandelion juice can help diabetic patients by stimulating the production of insulin from the pancreas, thereby keeping the blood sugar level low. Since dandelions are diuretic in nature, they increase urination in diabetic patients, which helps remove the excess sugar from the body. Diabetics are also prone to renal problems, so the diuretic properties of dandelion can help removing the sugar deposition in the kidneys through increased urination. Furthermore, dandelion juice is slightly bitter to taste, which effectively lowers the sugar level in the blood, as all bitter substances do. Consistently lower blood sugar and a more regulated system of insulin release prevents dangerous spikes and plunges for diabetic patients, so dandelion extracts can be a perfect solution!

Urinary Disorders: Dandelions are highly diuretic in nature, so they help eliminate deposits of toxic substances in the kidneys and the urinary tract. The disinfectant properties of dandelions also inhibit microbial growth in the urinary system. In fact, the diuretic properties of dandelions are so strong that in France, the flower is also called “pissenlit”  which means “urinate in bed”.

Skin Care: Dandelion sap, also known as dandelion milk, is useful in treating skin diseases which are caused by microbial and fungal infections. This treatment stems from the fact that the sap is highly alkaline and has germicidal, insecticidal and fungicidal properties. You should be careful while using this sap, and avoid any contact with the eyes. This sap can be used on itches, ringworm, eczema, and other skin conditions without the risk of side effects or hormonal disturbances commonly caused by pharmaceutical skin treatments.


Acne:
Dandelion juice is a good detoxifier, diuretic, stimulant and antioxidant. These four properties make it a great treatment for acne. Before we know how it treats acne, we must know what causes it. Acne typically arises during the teenage years, when the body undergoes many physiological and hormonal changes. The flood of new hormones that bring about the changes in the body must be regulated, but if they don’t remain at a healthy ratio, they tend to deposit somewhat toxic substances into the body. These toxins tend to come out along with sweat through the sweat glands or sebaceous glands on the skin.

During these hormonal changes, these glands secrete more oils which, when mixed with dead skin, block the pores and the secretion of toxins is obstructed. Therefore, the toxic substances cannot escape and eventually result in acne. This situation is exacerbated by the microbial infections on the effected places. Dandelion juice, being a stimulant, diuretic and detoxifier in nature, can help regulate proper secretion of hormones, increase sweating and widen the pores. All of these factors help to facilitate the removal of toxins through sweat and urine. Furthermore, dandelion sap, if externally applied to areas with acne, can inhibit microbial infection and reduce the frustrating signs of acne. Also, it can speed up healing due to its vitamin-C content, so the scars and ugly red inflammation that traditionally follows acne treatment will be less noticeable.

Weight Loss: Our urine consists of up to 4% fat, so the more we urinate, the more water and fats are lost from the body. Dandelions, being diuretic in nature, promotes urination and thereby helps lose the dreaded “water weight” without causing any side effects. Furthermore, dandelions are low in calories, like most leafy greens, but for the small expense of calories (~1oo cal./4 cups), you get a huge amount of beneficial side effects. This is also why dandelions are sometimes used as sweeteners, because they are not packed with unhealthy sugars.

Cancer: Dandelions are high in antioxidants, such as vitamin-C and Luteolin, which reduce the free radicals (major cancer-causing agents) in the body, thereby reducing the risk of cancer. It also detoxifies the body, which further helps protect from the development of tumors and various cancers. Luteolin actually poisons essential components of cancer cells when it binds to them, rendering them ineffective and unable to reproduce. This characteristic has been demonstrated most notably with prostate cancer, although there are other studies being done.

Jaundice: Jaundice is primarily a disorder of the liver in which the organ starts overproducing bile, which ultimately enters the bloodstream and wreaks havoc on the body’s metabolism. The excess bile is also reflected through color of the skin, and eyes, which typically develop a yellow tint. The treatment of jaundice includes three main steps. First, you need to curb the production of bile. Second, you must remove the excess bile from the body, and third, you have to fight the underlying viral infection.

Dandelions are very helpful in all of these steps. It promotes liver health and regulates bile production. Being diuretic in nature, it promotes urination, where the excess bile can be eliminated. Finally, as an antioxidant and disinfectant due to the presence of vitamin-C and Luteolin, it fights viral infections as well. It is most beneficial when taken with sugarcane juice, since it replaces the sugar in the body that is significantly lowered due to the impact of excess bile. A lack of sugar can cause extreme fatigue and weakness, so dandelions help boost your energy levels after infection!

Gall Bladder Disorders: Dandelions are very beneficial for the gall bladder and liver, because they improve their general functioning, protects them from ill effects of oxidants and infections, and regulates the various secretions from both organs.

dandelionConstipation: Certain components of dandelion, namely the high levels of dietary fiber, make it abeneficial aid for digestion and proper intestinal health. Dietary fiber stimulates healthy bowel movements by adding bulk to stool, and also reduces chances of constipation as well as diarrhea. It regulates bowel movements, which can prevent more serious gastrointestinal issues. It is commonly prescribed for children who are experiencing constipation, as it is relatively soothing on the stomach. It has also been used to stimulate the appetite, particularly following trauma or surgery.

Anemia: Dandelions have relatively good levels of iron, vitamins, and protein content. While iron is the integral part of hemoglobin in the blood, vitamins like vitamin-B and protein are essential for the formation of red blood cells and certain other components of the blood. This way dandelion can help anemic people keep their condition in check.

High Blood Pressure: Urination is an effective way of lowering blood pressure. In fact, most of the modern medicines for lowering blood pressure are based on this phenomenon. Dandelion juice, being diuretic in nature, increases urination, both in quantity and frequency. Therefore, it helps lower high blood pressure. The fiber in dandelion is also helpful in reducing cholesterol and thereby assists in lowering blood pressure, since cholesterol is one of the factors that increases blood pressure. Finally, there is the high potassium content of dandelions, which is very effective in lowering blood pressure by replacing sodium.

Other Benefits: Dandelions can also be used as a vegetable and is a good source of fiber. It promotes digestion, and in the past, it was used to treat scurvy, because of its high levels of vitamin-C. It also has healing effects on dyspepsia, infections in the stomach, intestines and urinary system.

A Few Words of Warning: Dandelions can be helpful to diabetics by lowering blood sugar, but for patients already taking blood-sugar modulators, this can result in hypoglycemia, an equally dangerous condition. Consult your doctor before adding dandelion supplements on top of your normal treatment. Also, the milk sap of dandelions has been known to cause itchiness, irritation, or allergic reactions on the skin, and should be kept away from the eyes. Finally, there is a rare type of fiber in dandelions called inulin, and some people have a predisposed sensitivity or allergy to it which can be quite severe. When first adding dandelion greens to your diet in any way, start small and closely monitor your body’s response.

Other than that, pick some delicious dandelion greens and get healthy!


Isn’t that AWESOME???  And don’t forget … YOUR HORSE LOVES DANDELIONS, too!  So be sure to add some dandelions daily to your horses’ diets.  Most of the attributes listed above also apply to horses. So NO MORE DIGGING OUT DANDELIONS FROM YOUR YARD!

Nurture them for HEALTH!  😀