Alternative Action: Treating Lymphangitis

“Swollen Leg Syndrome” is frustrating, but can be managed successfully.

by Holistic Horse Contributors
ask Holistic Horse

lymph4lateral

Lymphangitis in horse leg

“Swollen Leg Syndrome” is frustrating, but can be managed successfully.

INTRODUCTION

The lymphatics are a type of tubular system that drains excess fluids and proteins from tissue and gradually routes it back into the main blood circulation. Lymphatics are present practically everywhere in the body, but the most common place to encounter problems is in the legs of the horse.

Fluid in the lymphatics is dependent on movement, muscle contraction and pulsation of the blood vessels to keep it moving in the right direction. In some horses, standing idle for prolonged periods can lead to edema or swelling of the legs, often due to leakage of fluid from the lymphatics.

Some horses end up with chronic problems leading to intermittent stocking up or edema formation. As a veterinarian, I believe that managing the ongoing inflammatory process is critical for overall success. Through a combination approach, we can manage ongoing inflammation and modulate the immune response, which I feel is a major component to these conditions. — Tom Schell, DVM, www.curost.com

 

 lymphangitisillustration-rebeckablenntoft

THE EQUINE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM

Modern methods of keeping horses stabled, with limited time for free exercise and concentrated physical training sessions, create an unnatural pattern of movement. When a horse is standing still, the transport capacity of the lymphatic system decreases significantly. Both the velocity of flow and the total volume of lymph being moved will be reduced, putting the standing horse at a distinct disadvantage with regard to recovery from injury or exertion. The horse’s high number of lymph nodes (roughly 8000 compared to an average of 600 in the human) provides a greater propensity for lymphatic “bottlenecks” because lymphatic fluid slows down and concentrates upon entering each lymph node.

Notably, half of the horse’s 8000 lymph nodes are situated in the ascending colon. When access to ad lib forage is restricted, the horse’s lymphatic system is significantly compromised, as the lymph flow around the intestines is stimulated by the peristaltic action created from a continuous flow of food though the gut.

It is not unusual to see performance horses in their boxes almost permanently during the competitive season. A ration of hay or haylage given in the evening can be eaten up within a few hours, leaving the horse standing without food for up to 12 hours. The horse is then taken out for training exercise, whereby his lymphatic system is being asked to increase lymph flow from a compromised position very rapidly into a highly active state. Often horses are then returned to their stable still warm, and although the lymphatic system still has work to do in clearing cellular debris plus dealing with the consequential increase of arterial blood flow into the interstitium, it is not able to do so due to the return to inactivity.

It is therefore not surprising that many performance horses will develop swollen or filled legs as a result of lymphatic compromise. Many owners will try to reduce swelling by using elasticated stable bandages over some form of padding. However, this has been shown to simply transfer the edema via the superficial lymphatic system higher up the leg, where it gives the illusion of having dispersed. In 2006, a large veterinary study was undertaken in Germany to ascertain the effect of different types of bandaging on the lymphatic vessels. This involved injecting a continuous stream of contrast medium (dye) into the lymphatic vessels of horses under sedation and x-raying the effects. Horses bandaged with the elasticated stable bandages were found to have significantly impeded lymph flow when compared to those bandaged with specially designed lymphaticcompression bandages .

When one considers that every cell in the body relies upon receiving dissolved oxygen and nutrients from the interstitium to carry out its metabolic function properly, and that the lymphatic system collects cellular debris from the interstitium to filter and return it to the bloodstream, any disruption of the smooth functioning of the lymphatics will compromise cellular health. When the lymphatics are compromised (either by lack of movement, genetic predisposition, injury, surgery or post infection, such as in cases of lymphangitis), excess fluid within the interstitium will generally lead to edema forming ventrally to the abdomen, mammary glands or sheath, or distally to the limbs.

In horses, hind limbs will generally be more affected than front limbs due to the distance that the lymphatic fluid has to travel back along the thoracic duct to the superficial cervical lymph nodes and external jugular veins.

“Equine Lymphatic System”

Superficial Lymphatic Drainage Pathways of the Horse

Colored areas indicate skin territories, where lymph drains to a set of nodes within that territory. For example, territory III drains to the superficial cervical nodes shown as Lcs in the neck. If a horse has an injury to his lower foreleg, the lymph will drain upwards to that set of nodes. If a horse has an injury behind the ear, it will drain to the same nodes. The territories usually don’t allow lymph from one territory to another, but “watersheds” between them can allow lymph to pass if one area is overloaded. The white line shown running along the center of the spine and ventrally along the abdomen are absolute watersheds, and lymph cannot pass at all through those.

It’s important to note that the internal organs, bones, tendons and ligaments in each territory drain via the deep lymphatics to those same nodes. So the skin of territory I goes to the submandibular nodes under the jowl, but the teeth, bones, tongue, cartilage, etc. in territory I also drain to the submandibular. From there, the collected lymph goes back to the return point to the superficial cervical nodes (Lcs on the diagram). — Rebecka Blenntoft, blenntoftmld.com

LASER THERAPY

Therapeutic laser is used in human medicine to reduce the pain and swelling caused by edema in the lymphatics of the upper limbs, breast and neck, and it can effectively treat lymphangitis in our equine patients as well. Laser treatments modify the viscosity of the lymph, which helps the fluid to move more easily through the lymphatics.  It also softens the hard, fibrotic tissue which can provide a reduction in the volume of the edema in the limb, improving movement and flexibility. In addition to treating the bacterial infection, you can use the laser twice daily to treat the condition, delivering 3 joules/cm2 over all affected areas. You should also treat the lymph structures outside of the swollen tissue that are responsible for removing the fluid through the limbs. If the epidermis has become irritated and formed a crusty covering, reduce the dosage to 2 joules/cm2 around the crusted portion and maintain 3 joules in the remaining areas. Treating with the laser early in the process is recommended to reduce the fibrosis which can occur. There are no reported side effects from using laser treatment for this condition, and improvement is easy to measure and track. — Doreen Hudson,www.respondsystems.com

ESSENTIAL OILS

Essential oils are very effective in supporting the lymphatic system as they can improve the function of the circulatory system, aid in cellular detoxification and combat infection congruently. Cypress oil does all of these, reduces muscles spasms and nervous tension, and aids in digestion, making it a perfect oil for the barn. Other oil recommendations are Lemon and Grapefruit which most horses will lick right out of your hand. — Nan E. Martin, LSH-CRTS

HERBS

Robust immune and elimination systems should actively and positively discharge waste products of infection and inflammation. Lymphangitis is simply the result of this process not working efficiently. Less robust systems will try to function with a toxic load in the blood. Blood Cleanser Herbs include: Garlic, Elecampane, Echinacea, Nettle, Maritime Pine, Yarrow, Kelp, Violet Leaves, Horseradish, Horsetail, Red Clover and Rosehips along with the Bach Flowers Crab Apple and Rescue Remedy. A 12-week course is recommended, which is a full blood cycle. Adding Fenugreek and Rosehips to the feed as basic addition will ensure that the lymphatic system is well supported, as are kidneys. — Catherine McDowell, Herbalist

Herbal blends can help support your horse’s recovery from lymphangitis. Cleavers, calendula, fenugreek, violet leaves, and kelp aid your horse by stimulating the lymphatic system. Other herbs such as Echinacea help clear infection, while dandelion root and nettles help to drain the excess fluid. For anti-inflammatory and pain relief, devil’s claw or meadowsweet are good choices. Adding an herb that helps to balance immune function such as American Ginseng or another adaptogen would be beneficial. — Andrea Baldwin, Herbalist

HOMEOPATHY

Apis is a great homeopathic remedy for many cases of lymphangitis. The keynote for the use of the remedy Apis is significant swelling with lots of fluid under the skin, and the skin stretched tightly over the swelling, very similar as what a bee sting looks like. Lymphangitis creates a similar sort of swelling, where the skin becomes stretched over the fluid-filled leg. — Joyce Harman, DVM, MRCVS

KINESIOLOGY TAPE

Using kinesiology tape in Lymphangitis cases can be quite effective if you follow the correct protocols. The goal is to move collected fluid (blood flow and lymph) out of the affected area to reduce swelling (lymphadema). It is important to begin taping only after the initial infection is under control. — Dr. Beverly Gordon, www.Equi-Tape.com

ACUPRESSURE

Because there are three different types of lymphangitis (sporadic, ulcerative, and epizootic), varying in degrees of severity, follow the recommendations of your holistic veterinarian along with the acupressure session “Benefiting Lymphangitis”.

This session will help improve circulation, remove toxins, and reduce inflammation associated with this condition. — Amy Snow and Nancy Zidonis

MANUAL LYMPH DRAINAGE

Manual lymph drainage (MLD) is a light, painless therapy utilizing the power of the lymphatic system to treat a wide variety of conditions. MLD is able to move fluid from a region where the system isn’t functioning to one where it is. Very precise manual movements encourage tissue fluid to enter the initial lymph vessels and stimulate lymphatic contraction, greatly increasing the movement of lymph through the system. MLD is literally skin deep, working primarily with the superficial lymphatics. — Heather Powell, equinemld.com

 

OPPOSITE ILLUSIONS

What is the opposite of bucking? “Not bucking” you say? Nope, that’s not it. What is the opposite of “jigging”? Nope, wrong again. It’s not “not jigging”. What is the opposite of shoving? Hmmmm, “not shoving”? Nope … read on, my Friend. (Yep, its an oldie but goodie!)

Opposite Illusions

– Gwenyth Browning Jones Santagate © Aug 8, 2005
What is the opposite of bucking? “Not bucking” you say? Nope, that’s not it. What is the opposite of “jigging”? Nope, wrong again. It’s not “not jigging”. What is the opposite of shoving? Hmmmm, “not shoving”? Nope … read on, my Friend.

For every action there is a reaction and for every action there is a counterpart that is the opposite. The opposite of “bucking” would be walking forward. The opposite of shoving would be backing up. The opposite of jigging would be standing still or walking forward quietly. Instead of “punishing” an unwanted behavior in a horse why not think in terms of changing the negative behavior to a positive one and being able to reward your horse for doing something “right”. In essence, teaching the horse to do something else INSTEAD OF the offensive behavior? Give the horse a choice between the behaviors and making the “right choice” a rewarded experience. Sound pretty funky to you? Well, let’s take this scenario;

Susie has a 10 year old QH that is highly bred and extremely versatile. Susie has good riding background but limited ground training. (Notice that I said “Susie” has limited ground training vs. the horse having limited ground training!) … Roger, the QH, INSISTS on flying out the stall door whenever its opened, completely disregarding poor little Susie who tries desperately to stay out of his way yet at the same time, hang onto him. Susie’s trainer has suggested that everytime Roger begins to bolt out of the stall that Susie whack him on the chest with the crop. Susie’s TRIED to do this but Roger seems to be totally oblivious to Susie and her crop and manages every time to just keep on bargin’ through, dragging little Susie behind him. By now you’re thinking “I’d get a chain over that horse’s nose and that horse would learn a lesson or two!” Ah ha! What KIND of lesson would he learn? To be more respectful of Susie or the human standing in his way? Or would he learn to respond to pain, confusion, frustration and determination to get out of the stall and the experience even more quickly?

Horses naturally want to get along with their herd members. Part of their social interaction is learning to get along. Learning their own place within the herd and learning to respect those above them in rank. Horses are, by nature, gentle animals with extremely strong ideas about “fairness”. Doesn’t seem fair to me to punish Roger for barging out of the stall when all he wants to do is be a horse and get outdoors to move!

By whacking, or “punishing” Roger everytime he heeds his natural instinct as a horse without giving him a BETTER choice that helps him to stay safe and comfortable, Susie is doing nothing more than helping Roger build up his resentment and fear of humans and to learn to respond to a situation that gives him pain. So let’s think on this a bit. …

What could Susie DO, proactively, to 1. stop Roger from barging through and over her and 2. to keep Roger’s sensitive respect intact without adding fear or resentment to the equation? (You know that fear causes the horse to flight. That’s one of his primary behavioral standards.)

  1. Barging through and over human – represents lack of respect for one *supposedly* higher ranking. Represents the need to get out of confinement is greater than the need to be respsectful. Represents the “punishment” is not as strong of a stimulus as getting outside and responding to a natural instinctive call. — Issue of repecting higher ranking individual: Not the horse’s fault. Human needs to establish rank in a manner which the horse can understand. — Issue of the stronger instinctual behavior: There is no other motivator involved to override the instinctual need to get out of confinement. If confinement is associated with a pleasant experience that overrides the desire to leave, the horse will stick around! Food rewards, scritch rewards, etc. for a “right” behavior can override as motivators to initiate desired response in behaviors.

What is the opposite of barging? Standing still. Sub-Opposite behavior = waiting for appropriate cue to respectfully walk as leader requests.

Food as motivating behavior modification = MARKING the horse’s appropriate behavior at the INSTANT of that behavior then rewarding with a small enough tidbit as to motivate the horse to want more. (Please note that food rewards CAN be given from small bucket instead of hand if so desired. The transporter of the reward is not as important as the reward, itself.)

Bribery, you say? No. M-o-t-i-v-a-t-i-o-n. Every mammal needs motivation to execute a behavior. The level of motivation must exceed other motivators in strength in order to prompt behavior. In other words, would you rather “work” for a pat on the head or a homemade chocolate cookie? Personally, the chocolate chip cookie wins hands down for me!

How to teach the opposite of Barging … that is, standing still or stepping backwards

backwards away from human at stall door (better choice of behavior to teach)

Behavior desired = stepping backwards 3 steps when stall door is opened and waiting, respectfully, for human to request forward motion. Must break down the behavior as it is comprised of several “steps”. 1st step would be to step backwards instead of barging forward.

Set up a cue that you can use consistently when asking the horse to back up for you. Choose your “marker” of behavior, that is the audible sound you will use to indicate to the horse that it has executed the proper behavior. A mechanical clicker will work, a tongue click, a “kiss” sound, a “cluck” sound … a verbal Good! … whatever works for YOU but sound must be clear, crisp, short and easily identifiable by the horse. (I’ll use “click” just as the marker word for this article)

Begin teaching the horse what a marker is:

“click!” and give 1 or 2 Cheerios as “reward”. Repeat this process until your horse associates your marker sound with the reward. Now you’re ready to begin simple exercise of backing up 3 steps.

Ask horse to back up – use pressure and voice command. Instant the horse even thinks to back up, “click” and reward. Repeat several times until you’re receiving 100% result.

Ask horse to now actually move body backwards (vs. merely indicating he’s “thinking” about it) … give the cue to back and keep the pressure on the horse until he actually MOVES his body back one step. Click! Reward. Repeat until horse is responding 100%.

Now, do the same again but ask for 2 steps back. Then 3 and … now you’ve taught the horse the OPPOSITE of barging through you – you’ve taught him to respectfully back up 3 steps away from you! You’ve given him a CHOICE of behaviors to execute when you open that stall door. (Susie, this really isn’t difficult – just takes a bit of time and patience.)

Ready to teach him to stand still? (2nd part of the overall behavior that you’re trying to reach)

Now that you have the horse backing up, ask him “Whoa” … if he moves forward, ask him to back up and CLICK! and REWARD the second his stands without moving. Repeat and gradually request that he stand longer and longer until YOU say, “OK! Good job! NOW you may walk through the stall door!”

door!” … So now you’ve added more to the exercises by teaching the horse another opposite of “barging” behavior. You’ve taught him to stand still. Standing still is a CHOICE the horse makes which makes the behavior a decision and not an empty, thoughtless behavior.

Think of the difference between, “I’m not doing anything!” and … “I’m doing nothing.” Two completely different behaviors. “Doing nothing” is a decision based behavior. “I’m not doing anything” is a thoughtless, lacking in thought, of doing anything. So, the opposite of “I’m not doing anything” is … “I’m doing *nothing*.” In essence, I’m also saying that we’re teaching the barging horse to “do nothing” while standing quietly and waiting for his human to request forward movement. So, another “opposite” of barging would be to do “nothing”.

Whenever you’re working around a horse it is imperative to always think of the consequences of what YOUR behavior and requests will reap from the horse. Every action has a reaction. Our requests have reactions from the horse. They can be thoughtless reactions or they can be thought-FILLED choices that the horse makes.

Every action has an opposite. Think of the opposite actions that your horse chooses to execute today for you and start teaching him the proper action/behavior that you REALLY want.

Bucking? Move forward. Rearing? Move forward. Barging? Step back and wait. Jigging? Walk quietly. Doesn’t lift hoof? Lift hoof! Doesn’t lead? Give to pressure.

Think of your opposites and start working on them today. You’ll have a safer day and a much more pleasant relationship with your horse.

  1. Susie? If that’s you, drop me an email if you’re still getting “stuck” in front of your barging horse and I’ll see what I can do for you! Simply write to gwen.santagate@gmail.com!

 

Every living thing on our planet has an energy field – the world is full of energy fields all interacting with each other. Some species are more sensitive to energy than others: horses are incredibly aware of and in tune with it, whereas we humans seem, for the most part, to have lost our connection to and awareness of it. –http://www.holisticequinetherapist.com/blog/fields-of-energy-fields

For years I’ve been harping on energy, intent, intuitiveness with horses, etc. etc. … and this article sums it all up very nicely.

I LOVE when I find others who are in tune with life’s energies. And I LOVE when someone asks me about it all and is wanting to learn! I get excited to be able to help someone discover how their energy and intent can not only help their relationships with their horses, but their relationships with other people as well.

Learning about our horses’ energies will directly affect our own energy and how we use it. It can, if we allow, change our entire world!

Be sure to read this article.  I know you’ll enjoy it!
And if you’re interesting in learning about all this, call me +1 (239) 573-9687 or email to me – gwen.santagate@gmail.com  I can help you no matter where you are in the world! 🙂 Remember — we’re all connected.

http://www.holisticequinetherapist.com/blog/fields-of-energy-fields

Ground Snuffling

Horses — eating off the ground, snuffling up bits of this and that and oh, so tenderly snipping JUST the right blade of grass.

Or leaf, or weed, or twig, or even a pebble or two.

And you say … horrors?  and I say … AWESOME!

This is the way horses are created to eat!

Head down, sinuses and bronchial tubes draining, no chaff or other tidbits getting into the eyes or nose from uplifted face … and c.a.l.m.  Horses are calm when they’re grazing down.

And picking up pebbles here and there to chew on?  Heck, they keep their teeth ‘floated naturally’ that way.

What about the way the entire lower jaw drops forward so the teeth can align properly for optimal chewing and wearing?

The variety … ohhhhhh, the variety of natural forages there are.

Natural horses have been eating this way for thousand of years. Head down grazing forages … no buckets, no hay nets, no rubber mats on the ground. All of that ‘stuff’ is really for the horses’ humans’ conveniences. Not theirs.

They’re happy just snuffling along with their noses in the dirt and grass.

Cause that’s the way it’s ‘posed to be.

Detoxing Your Horses

Over the course of everyday life we ALL pick up toxins of one sort or another. It’s simply a fact of living in today’s world.

There’s alot of info out there in cyber-land about detoxing our selves but … do you ever think about your horses needing it?

They need to detox as much as we do.

Especially the young, the seniors and the not-so-well guys.

I use a natural, raw, naturally chelated mineral supplement for all of the members in my herd. This stuff is amazing in and of itself but … for detoxing?  The minerals will help detox along with a raw, fresh forage diet combined with various supportive therapies with essential oils, immuno-regulators (natural) and even the ‘lifestyle’ of the horse – the husbandry, exercise, handling, stress levels, etc – but also with HERBS for maximum effects. 

The following are some of the more effective herbs that can be added into the horses’ salads and minerals:

BASIL: Antifungal, antibacterial
BENTONITE CLAY-detoxes heavy metals while providing vital minerals (MONTMORILLONITE CLAY is the BASE of the minerals I referenced – even better than Bentonite!) 
DANDELION ROOT -increases bile which improves liver/kidney/gallbladder function
ECHINACEA-boosts immune response
FENUGREEK-helps flush the body and break up mucous/congestion while improving digestion
MILK THISTLE-flushes and heals the urinary tract, but specifically works on the liver
NETTLE-kidney and adrenal gland tonic that also provides a wide variety of nutrients
ROSEHIP-assists in cleaning bladder and kidneys, raises alkalinity level, promotes a healthy immune system
YARROW-promotes secretion of digestive enzymes. This herb is considered a healing herb
YELLOW DOCK-improves the flow of bile and digestive juices, increasing elimination from the body

The general rule of thumb for amounts to be given to standard sized horses from Hillary Page Self (founder of Hilton Herbs) is 32 gms a day (or just a tad bit more than 1 oz. daily)

REMEMBER — you’re trying to DETOX your horse so BE SURE that the herbs you purchase are ALL ORGANIC.

I do offer personal consults so if you’re thinking you’d like to get some further advice and help with this or with other challenges you may be facing with your horse, just holler at me.  You can contact me via email gwen.santagate@gmail.com or by telephone (239) 573-9687.  Leave a message if I am not able to pick up when you call. I’ll call you back as soon as I possible can. Promise!  😀

The Importance of Minerals in our Horses’ Diets

Minerals in our horses’ diets are essential in order for the body to work properly – for growth, for utilization in muscles, nerves, and turning the food our horses eat into energy. Most of all they are essential for maintaining a state of health and well-being.

Different minerals are required by the horse’s body in different amounts and many are synergistic. They are classified in groups of trace minerals, major minerals and minerals.

No nutrient or minerals can alter the horse’s well-being single-handedly.  Nutrients and minerals need to be balanced. While a “healthy” diet will provide all the essential minerals we find it hard-pressed to find a diet suggested for horses that does not include GMO, GE, and foods heavily processed with chemicals, artificial flavors, colors and preservatives. Add that to grains that are heavily herbicided, pesticided and fertilized — its a sad commentary on what we consider ‘healthy’ for our horses today.

What might be considered adequate minerals intake will include the following minerals as listed in this chart from webmd.com …

Macrominerals

Major minerals
Mineral Function Sources
Sodium Needed for proper fluid balance, nerve transmission, and muscle contraction Table salt, soy sauce; large amounts in processed foods; small amounts in milk, breads, vegetables, and unprocessed meats
Chloride Needed for proper fluid balance,stomach acid Table salt, soy sauce; large amounts in processed foods; small amounts in milk, meats, breads, and vegetables
Potassium Needed for proper fluid balance, nerve transmission, and muscle contraction Meats, milk, fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, legumes
Calcium Important for healthy bones and teeth; helps muscles relax and contract; important in nerve functioning, blood clotting, blood pressure, blood regulation, immune system health Milk and milk products; canned fish with bones (salmon, sardines); fortified tofu and fortified soy milk; greens (broccoli, mustard greens); legumes
Phosphorus Important for healthy bones and teeth; found in every cell; part of the system that maintains acid-base balance Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, milk, processed foods (including soda pop)
Magnesium Found in bones; needed for making protein, muscle contraction, nerve transmission, immune system health Nuts and seeds; legumes; leafy, green vegetables; seafood; chocolate; artichokes; “hard” drinking water
Sulfur Found in protein molecules Occurs in foods as part of protein: meats, poultry, fish, eggs, milk, legumes, nuts

Trace minerals (microminerals)

The body needs trace minerals in very small amounts. Note that iron is considered to be a trace mineral, although the amount needed is somewhat more than for other microminerals.

Trace minerals
Mineral Function Sources
Iron Part of a molecule (hemoglobin) found in red blood cells that carry oxygen in the body; needed for energy metabolism Organ meats; red meats; fish; poultry; shellfish (especially clams); egg yolks; legumes; dried fruits; dark, leafy greens; iron-enriched breads and cereals; and fortified cereals
Zinc Part of many enzymes; needed for making protein and genetic material; has a function in taste perception, wound healing, normal fetal development, production of sperm, normal growth and sexual maturation, immune system health Meats, fish, poultry, leavened whole grains, vegetables
Iodine Found in thyroid hormone, which helps regulate growth, development, and metabolism Seafood, foods grown in iodine-rich soil, iodized salt, bread, dairy products
Selenium Antioxidant Meats, seafood, grains
Copper Part of many enzymes; needed for iron metabolism Legumes, nuts and seeds, whole grains, organ meats, drinking water
Manganese Part of many enzymes Widespread in foods, especially plant foods
Fluoride Involved in formation of bones and teeth; helps prevent tooth decay Drinking water (either fluoridated or naturally containing fluoride), fish, and most teas
Chromium Works closely with insulin to regulate glucose levels Unrefined foods, especially liverl, brewer’s yeast, whole grains, nuts, cheeses
Molybdenum Part of some enzymes Legumes; breads and grains; leafy greens; leafy, green vegetables; milk; liver

Other trace nutrients known to be essential in tiny amounts include nickel, silicon, vanadium, and cobalt.

Truth be told, in ancient mines one will find 78+ minerals – all of which are needed in order to keep our horses in a healthy state of homeostasis.  Compare the chart above with this chart from Window Peak Minerals, NV:  (far cry from what we’re led to believe is all that is necessary)

Aluminum Al Holmium Ho Rhodium Rh
Antimony Sb Hydrogen H Rubidium Rb
Arsenic As Indium In Ruthenium Ru
Barium Ba Iodine I Samarium Sm
Beryllium Be Iridium Ir Scandium Sc
Bismuth Bi Iron Fe Selenium Se
Boron B Lanthanum La Silicon Si
Bromine Br Lead Pb Silver Ag
Cadmium Cd Lithium Li Sodium Na
Calcium Ca Lutetium Lu Strontium Sr
Carbon C Manganese Mn Sulphur S
Cerium Ce Magnesium Mg Tantalum Ta
Cesium Cs Mercury Hg Tellurium Te
Chlorine Cl Molybdenum Mo Terbium Tb
Chromium Cr Neodymium Nd Thallium Tl
Cobalt Co Nickel Ni Thorium Th
Copper Cu Niobium Nb Thulium Tm
Dysprosium Dy Nitrogen N Tin Sn
Erbium Er Osmium Os Titanium Ti
Europium Eu Oxygen O Tungsten W
Fluorine F Palladium Pd Uranium U
Gadolinium Gd Phosphorus P Vanadium V
Gallium Ga Platinum Pt Ytterbium Yb
Germanium Ge Potassium K Yttrium Y
Gold Au Praseodymium Pr Zinc Zn
Hafnium Hf Rhenium Re Zirconium Zr

Key to above mineral chart —

Green = essential element for some or most plants
Red = essential trace mineral for humans*
Fuchsia = essential trace mineral for livestock and pets**
Black BOLD = macro mineral essential to both humans and animals
Underlined Black = electrolyte essential to all animal life
Plain Black = unconfirmed application to human and/or animal nutiritional needs

* Chlorine and Fluorine are noted in their elemental gaseous state. In Window Peak Trace Minerals these elements combine with other elements to produce the minerals Chloride and Fluoride. Fluorite, a crystal resembling a translucent rock is yet another compound of Fluorine. Also note that Oxygen is also required by animal life, but is a gas and therefore not a mineral. Besides, we all need it in “macro” amounts.

** Livestock and pets also need the minerals listed in red.

All of them in a montmorillonite clay base to help bind and carry toxins out of the body.
Now, think of the feral horse that lives out in the wild … what do they need? What do they get? Depending on the area in which they live and graze, they’ll get pretty much all of what is listed above. How do they get it?  By grazing forages and eating or licking dirt. Simple.

What does YOUR horse get?  Take a look at the ingredient list on your supply of minerals. I can guarantee that you won’t find any like you’ll find from Window Peak, NV.  And so many people moan about their horses licking rocks or eating dirt. Why do they do that?

Because they NEED MINERALS!

So, where can you GET Window Peak Minerals?

Well, that’s easy!  You can get them from me. I get a small percentage of each ‘sale’; I am NOT a distributor.  But when I found NATURAL HORSE MINERALS and tried them out I swore I’ll NEVER CHANGE to another AND I have to tell others about them simply because I love helping horses and their humans.  Here’s where you can order them: http://www.thepenzancehorse.com/wordpress/?p=85

Or, simply write to me at gwen.santagate@gmail.com and request an order. It’s as simple as that.

Once you switch or add these minerals to your horses’ diets you’ll never switch back to anything else.

I promise.

To You It Shall Be Food

“And God said: ‘Behold, I have given you every herb yielding seed, which is upon the face of all the earth, and every tree, in which is the fruit of a tree yielding seed–to you it shall be for food; 
and to every beast of the earth, and to every fowl of the air, and to every thing that creepeth upon the earth, wherein there is a living soul, I have given every green herb for food’ And it was so.”   –Genesis 1:29-30

The 7 Most Prescribed Drugs In The World And Their Natural Counterparts

We don’t have to live in a medicated world, but we certainly choose to. The crux of the matter is that we refuse to proactively think about prevention because we reactively commit to treating the symptoms of underlying health problems. This is the allopathic model. We want the quick fix so we can continue our poor lifestyle and dietary habits. It doesn’t have to be this way, but it is. We can blame doctors, the medical institutions and healthcare systems all we want, but self-responsibility is our only recourse if we are ever to surface from this mess. There are no excuses–if you’re taking one of these drugs, consult with a Natural Health Practitioner this week about phasing out your medication and phasing in these powerful natural foods and remedies.

Read the entire article here:  http://www.realfarmacy.com/the-7-most-prescribed-drugs-in-the-world-and-their-natural-counterparts/