FEEDING RAW TO HORSES …

Found this article today from Rutgers … while I was looking for cites to back up raw, fresh forage feeding of horses – in particular, laminitic horses.

 

anything in bold italics and [ … ] are MY notes; not those from the author.

 

Sarah L. Ralston, VMD, Ph.D., dACVN, Department of Animal Science, Cook
College, Rutgers University

Fact Sheet #062 – Reviewed 2004

Horses are adapted to a diet based primarily of forages. Their digestive systems are geared toward the digestion of high roughage feeds that change slowly (for example, sudden access to a bag of grain or lush pasture after they have eaten only dry hay for the previous 5 months is likely to result in colic). However, with domestication, confinement, and modern technology, we are often confronted with horses that consume some really “odd” things with apparent relish. Feeding practices around the world differ and horses in other countries are commonly fed things that average American horse owners would never consider offering to their horses. For example, European horses are routinely fed silage, horses in Saudi Arabia munch happily on dried fava beans, and Irish horses are offered a weekly pint of ale or stout! With the above digestive constraints and variation in mind, what is presented here is by no means an exhaustive list of non-traditional things that might be consumed by horses. It is a list of things that horses have been reported to eat by veterinarians and horse owners around the world. Those that might adversely affect the horse’s health, and therefore be avoided or at least limited, are so identified.

 

Oddities often consumed by horses on pasture  [I do not consider these plants to be ‘oddities’ but a ‘staple’ for horses on pasture]
No problem, assuming fairly limited quantities and otherwise balanced ration:

Dandelion

Thistle (NOT Russian Knapweed or yellow star thistle–Centaurea spp)

Sunflower seeds and plant

Peanut plants

Raspberry/blackberry bushes

Wood/bark of most trees (NOT Prunus spp or black walnut or locust)

 

Potential problem if eaten in large quantities
Buttercup

Morning glory

Pokeweed

St. Johnswort

Gum-weed

Astragulus and Oxytropis spp/(vetches and locoweed)

Avocado leaves

Bracken fern

Most bulb type flowers (tulip, iris, etc.)

Wilted red maple leaves  [Red maple FRESH on tree are OK … still exercise caution. It is the WILTED leaves, especially those separated from the tree that are lethal. Brown, dead, crunchy leaves are no issue at all.]

Acorns/new oak leaves

 

Avoid at all costs (Lethal or severe toxicity potential)
Lily of the Valley

Larkspur

Tomato or potato plants

Rhubarb leaves and roots

Poison hemlock

Foxglove

Leafy spurge

Mustards

Jimsonweed

Alsike clover

Blue flax

Sorghum (Johnsongrass and Sudan grass)

Oleander

Privet

Japanese Yew (all Taxus spp)

Azalea

Rhododendron

Mountain Laurel

Pits of peaches, cherries, or avocados

Horsechestnut

Russian Knapweed or yellow star thistle–Centaurea spp

 

Potential Treats
Perfectly acceptable treats (fed in limited quantities(<1-2 lbs/feeding)

[Any one of these can be incorporated into a daily “salad” for a horse. See the base diet we use here on PENZANCE here…  http://www.tierneymissionbelize.org/thepenzancehorse/BASICDIETHANDOUT.pdf ]

Carrots, apples, grapes

Bananas

Peas

Green beans

Lettuce

Celery

Dried beans, such as pinto, red, fava (however should be cooked or heat treated)

Watermelon rinds

Squash

Mangoes (not the seeds)

Raisins

Bread/bagels/cake (NOT if they contain chocolate or poppy seeds)

Pasta, macaroni

Potato chips and potato products

Rice products (not raw rice)

Barley products

Corn products

Dairy products

Eggs

Fruit juices

Hot dogs, hamburgers, tuna fish, ham or even roastbeef sandwiches!

Most dog and cat foods

 

Beware large quantities, but probably acceptable in very small amounts (<2 to 4 ounces/day)

Cabbage, broccoli, kale, chard, collard greens, brussel sprouts [CABBAGE IS ESSENTIAL FOR THE HORSE THAT IS SUFFERING FROM ULCERS OR DEVELOPING ULCERS. Just a small handful of shredded cabbage a day will help turn around a horse with bleeding ulcers !!! in just 3 weeks. Scoped and veterinarian verified.]

Spinach

Rhubarb stems (NOT the leaves or roots)

Garlic and onions (large amounts may cause anemia) [https://fbresearch.org/coconut-and-onion-dewormers/ — BOTH garlic and onion are offer effective parasite control!  Combine with raw, virgin, organic coconut oil]

Turnips

Radishes

Avocado (NOT skins or seeds)

Lathyrus spp. beans (India)

Sunflower seeds

Sugar candies such as jelly beans, gummy bears, peppermints, etc.

 

Safe in very limited quantities BUT WILL CAUSE POSITIVE DRUG TESTS
Morning glory plants

Sassafras

Willow leaves and bark

Yucca

Tobacco (consumed, not inhaled)

Valerian root

Carrots in very large quantities only (over 5 lbs day)!

Persimmons (seeds also may cause impaction)

Chocolate in any form

Licorice?

Cinnamon products

Nutmeg

Hot pepper/chili flavored products (Nacho chips, etc)

Non-decaffeinated coffee or tea in any form

Caffeinated sodas

Alcoholic beverages?

Some dog/cat foods (Beware “bakery waste” as an ingredient-may contain chocolate)

 

Summary

There are obviously a wide range of things that our horses may enjoy consuming, not all of which are good for their health. Many horses would refuse to even sniff many of the items listed above. Knowing which potential treats are safe, at least in limited quantities, is important for horse owners. You never know what might be offered to your horse! For more information on signs and sources of toxicity the author recommends the following resources:

 

Reference

Lewis, Lon. 1995. Feeding and Care of the Horse, 2d ed.

Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA. Excellent chapters on toxic plants and feed induced diseases.
Toxic Plants Website: Excellent site with many links to other resources:http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/plants.html.

 

REFERENCE:  http://esc.rutgers.edu/fact_sheet/odd-things-that-horses-eat/

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RAW HONEY KILLS ALL

The health benefits of raw, unprocessed honey are well known, but in Australia, scientists recently made a startling discovery – that one particular, obscure type of honey is capable of killing just about everything scientists throw at it, including some of the worst bacteria known to man.

The findings were published in the European Journal of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (June 2009), and could hold special significance at a time when many of the world’s top antibiotics are failing, especially against resistant “superbugs.”

The honey in question in known as Manuka Honeywhich is produced in New Zealand and also goes by the name of jelly bush honey … ”

READ MORE HERE:  http://www.realfarmacy.com/obscure-honey/#!prettyPhoto

Dandelions!

Dandelion

What an awesome weed!  BUT WAIT …  “weed?” you say. “I’ve spent hundreds of hours trying to get RID of all the dandelions in my yard! and now you’re telling me how awesome it is !?”

YEP.  Sure am!

Take a look at the health benefits of Dandelions from organicfacts.net …


Health Benefits of Dandelions

The health benefits of dandelions include the following:

Bone Health: Dandelions are rich in calcium, which is essential for the growth and strength of bones, and they are rich in antioxidants like vitamin-C and Luteolin, which protect bones from age-related damage. This inevitable damage is often due to free radicals, and is frequently seen as bone frailty, weakness, and decreased density.

Liver Disorders: Dandelions can help the liver in many ways. While the antioxidants like vitamin-C and Luteolin keep the liver functioning in optimal gear and protect it from aging, other compounds in dandelions help treat hemorrhaging in the liver. Furthermore, dandelions aid in maintaining the proper flow of bile, while also stimulating the liver and promoting digestion. Proper digestion can reduce the chances of constipation, which in turn reduces the risk of more serious gastrointestinal issues.

Diabetes: Dandelion juice can help diabetic patients by stimulating the production of insulin from the pancreas, thereby keeping the blood sugar level low. Since dandelions are diuretic in nature, they increase urination in diabetic patients, which helps remove the excess sugar from the body. Diabetics are also prone to renal problems, so the diuretic properties of dandelion can help removing the sugar deposition in the kidneys through increased urination. Furthermore, dandelion juice is slightly bitter to taste, which effectively lowers the sugar level in the blood, as all bitter substances do. Consistently lower blood sugar and a more regulated system of insulin release prevents dangerous spikes and plunges for diabetic patients, so dandelion extracts can be a perfect solution!

Urinary Disorders: Dandelions are highly diuretic in nature, so they help eliminate deposits of toxic substances in the kidneys and the urinary tract. The disinfectant properties of dandelions also inhibit microbial growth in the urinary system. In fact, the diuretic properties of dandelions are so strong that in France, the flower is also called “pissenlit”  which means “urinate in bed”.

Skin Care: Dandelion sap, also known as dandelion milk, is useful in treating skin diseases which are caused by microbial and fungal infections. This treatment stems from the fact that the sap is highly alkaline and has germicidal, insecticidal and fungicidal properties. You should be careful while using this sap, and avoid any contact with the eyes. This sap can be used on itches, ringworm, eczema, and other skin conditions without the risk of side effects or hormonal disturbances commonly caused by pharmaceutical skin treatments.


Acne:
Dandelion juice is a good detoxifier, diuretic, stimulant and antioxidant. These four properties make it a great treatment for acne. Before we know how it treats acne, we must know what causes it. Acne typically arises during the teenage years, when the body undergoes many physiological and hormonal changes. The flood of new hormones that bring about the changes in the body must be regulated, but if they don’t remain at a healthy ratio, they tend to deposit somewhat toxic substances into the body. These toxins tend to come out along with sweat through the sweat glands or sebaceous glands on the skin.

During these hormonal changes, these glands secrete more oils which, when mixed with dead skin, block the pores and the secretion of toxins is obstructed. Therefore, the toxic substances cannot escape and eventually result in acne. This situation is exacerbated by the microbial infections on the effected places. Dandelion juice, being a stimulant, diuretic and detoxifier in nature, can help regulate proper secretion of hormones, increase sweating and widen the pores. All of these factors help to facilitate the removal of toxins through sweat and urine. Furthermore, dandelion sap, if externally applied to areas with acne, can inhibit microbial infection and reduce the frustrating signs of acne. Also, it can speed up healing due to its vitamin-C content, so the scars and ugly red inflammation that traditionally follows acne treatment will be less noticeable.

Weight Loss: Our urine consists of up to 4% fat, so the more we urinate, the more water and fats are lost from the body. Dandelions, being diuretic in nature, promotes urination and thereby helps lose the dreaded “water weight” without causing any side effects. Furthermore, dandelions are low in calories, like most leafy greens, but for the small expense of calories (~1oo cal./4 cups), you get a huge amount of beneficial side effects. This is also why dandelions are sometimes used as sweeteners, because they are not packed with unhealthy sugars.

Cancer: Dandelions are high in antioxidants, such as vitamin-C and Luteolin, which reduce the free radicals (major cancer-causing agents) in the body, thereby reducing the risk of cancer. It also detoxifies the body, which further helps protect from the development of tumors and various cancers. Luteolin actually poisons essential components of cancer cells when it binds to them, rendering them ineffective and unable to reproduce. This characteristic has been demonstrated most notably with prostate cancer, although there are other studies being done.

Jaundice: Jaundice is primarily a disorder of the liver in which the organ starts overproducing bile, which ultimately enters the bloodstream and wreaks havoc on the body’s metabolism. The excess bile is also reflected through color of the skin, and eyes, which typically develop a yellow tint. The treatment of jaundice includes three main steps. First, you need to curb the production of bile. Second, you must remove the excess bile from the body, and third, you have to fight the underlying viral infection.

Dandelions are very helpful in all of these steps. It promotes liver health and regulates bile production. Being diuretic in nature, it promotes urination, where the excess bile can be eliminated. Finally, as an antioxidant and disinfectant due to the presence of vitamin-C and Luteolin, it fights viral infections as well. It is most beneficial when taken with sugarcane juice, since it replaces the sugar in the body that is significantly lowered due to the impact of excess bile. A lack of sugar can cause extreme fatigue and weakness, so dandelions help boost your energy levels after infection!

Gall Bladder Disorders: Dandelions are very beneficial for the gall bladder and liver, because they improve their general functioning, protects them from ill effects of oxidants and infections, and regulates the various secretions from both organs.

dandelionConstipation: Certain components of dandelion, namely the high levels of dietary fiber, make it abeneficial aid for digestion and proper intestinal health. Dietary fiber stimulates healthy bowel movements by adding bulk to stool, and also reduces chances of constipation as well as diarrhea. It regulates bowel movements, which can prevent more serious gastrointestinal issues. It is commonly prescribed for children who are experiencing constipation, as it is relatively soothing on the stomach. It has also been used to stimulate the appetite, particularly following trauma or surgery.

Anemia: Dandelions have relatively good levels of iron, vitamins, and protein content. While iron is the integral part of hemoglobin in the blood, vitamins like vitamin-B and protein are essential for the formation of red blood cells and certain other components of the blood. This way dandelion can help anemic people keep their condition in check.

High Blood Pressure: Urination is an effective way of lowering blood pressure. In fact, most of the modern medicines for lowering blood pressure are based on this phenomenon. Dandelion juice, being diuretic in nature, increases urination, both in quantity and frequency. Therefore, it helps lower high blood pressure. The fiber in dandelion is also helpful in reducing cholesterol and thereby assists in lowering blood pressure, since cholesterol is one of the factors that increases blood pressure. Finally, there is the high potassium content of dandelions, which is very effective in lowering blood pressure by replacing sodium.

Other Benefits: Dandelions can also be used as a vegetable and is a good source of fiber. It promotes digestion, and in the past, it was used to treat scurvy, because of its high levels of vitamin-C. It also has healing effects on dyspepsia, infections in the stomach, intestines and urinary system.

A Few Words of Warning: Dandelions can be helpful to diabetics by lowering blood sugar, but for patients already taking blood-sugar modulators, this can result in hypoglycemia, an equally dangerous condition. Consult your doctor before adding dandelion supplements on top of your normal treatment. Also, the milk sap of dandelions has been known to cause itchiness, irritation, or allergic reactions on the skin, and should be kept away from the eyes. Finally, there is a rare type of fiber in dandelions called inulin, and some people have a predisposed sensitivity or allergy to it which can be quite severe. When first adding dandelion greens to your diet in any way, start small and closely monitor your body’s response.

Other than that, pick some delicious dandelion greens and get healthy!


Isn’t that AWESOME???  And don’t forget … YOUR HORSE LOVES DANDELIONS, too!  So be sure to add some dandelions daily to your horses’ diets.  Most of the attributes listed above also apply to horses. So NO MORE DIGGING OUT DANDELIONS FROM YOUR YARD!

Nurture them for HEALTH!  😀

 

 

NOT JUST A WEED!

PURSLANE

purslane

Purslane, also known as Portulaca oleracea, is considered a common weed to many that may even be growing in your garden right now, without your explicit invitation.

It started its cultivation in India and Persia, and spread to the rest of the world. Some cultures pluck it out and throw it away with leaf clippings and other weeds, while others cultivate it specifically to eat as food.

Purslane is an aesthetically attractive weed with fleshy leaves and often yellow flowers, but its health benefits are even more desirable.

Power-Packed Purslane

Common in our yards but little known in the North American kitchen, purslane is both delicious and exceptionally nutritious. Common purslane (Portulaca oleracea) — also known as duckweed, fatweed, pursley, pussley, verdolagas and wild portulaca — is the most frequently reported “weed” species in the world. It can grow anywhere that has at least a two-month growing season.

Until recently, most research on purslane has focused on its eradication. A frequently overlooked approach to controlling this weed is to eat it! Purslane is so surprisingly tasty, North Carolina market gardener Patryk Battle says, “I have rarely had anybody not buy purslane after they’ve tried it.”

Purslane is somewhat crunchy and has a slight lemony taste. Some people liken it to watercress or spinach, and it can substitute for spinach in many recipes. Young, raw leaves and stems are tender and are good in salads and sandwiches. They can also be lightly steamed or stir-fried. Purslane’s high level of pectin (known to lower cholesterol) thickens soups and stews.

Battle also uses purslane in pesto. He throws basil and purslane (upper stems and all) into a blender or food processor, adds a small amount of olive oil, garlic, pine nuts and enough hot water to get a good consistency. Because it’s so juicy, purslane helps create a low-fat pesto without too much oil.

[via motherearthnews.com]