ALWAYS BE PREPARED!

The season is comin’ upon us … BE PREPARED!

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/master-tonic…/…

NOTE — in the article they talk about stinky hands from the garlic and stinging eyes from the chopping. I have a couple of awesome kitchen gadgets that will lessen those issues exponentially! Wanna know what they are?

IT’S A BRAND NEW CHAPTER NOW

AUTUMN 2022 || SOMETHING NEW

Oops — I have sorely neglected this web site but not without thought. Thinking I REALLY need to update it! And, so, here I be —

Life since January, the last entry, has been a kind of a retrospective yet prospective period of time all at the same time. I am now on the flip side of 70, soon to be 71 years old. I certainly don’t FEEL that old! However, as is the case with most humans, aging does change one’s state of being as well as one’s perspective.

Those things I used to do without thought I now execute very thoughtfully, if at all.

Like working with aggressive horses or trimming hooves or riding the 4+’ jumps (or even riding a horse at all!) … those things are either physically not possible to do any longer or they require much forethought as to if the risk is worth taking at this point in time or not. I do carry a healthy mindful of the “what ifs?” … but they no longer obsessively kidnap me as they did for awhile. Praise God for that!

However, that being said, I still have obligations and responsibilities that require daily activities that MUST be done such as … feeding horses, ponies and donkeys as well as our more benign chickens and bunnies, dogs and cats.

Tending to the gardens and helping the Hubby as much as possible with his activities. I’m not at all adverse to splitting and stacking wood for the winter, hauling out brush from the river, mowing the fields and cleaning up the river walk in our woods. I’d much rather be riding but ………………………. ha! Caught me!

Mucking stalls and paddocks – while, I’m not as particular as I used to be, I’m still rather picky-une about them. To keep my semi-sanity that chore must be done daily.

Trimming 4 or 5 sets of hooves a day is an impossibility for me at this time. I’m lucky to get 2 hooves done a day without my back and neck screaming at me to take a break! And, my hands curling up and spasming like withered old branches. HA! This is quite frustrating as I remember well the days of trimming 15 or 16 horses a day, 64 hooves, and traveling over 200 miles from barn to barn – just as a matter of course for a day – working 70 – 60 hrs a week. Well, one could say that’s why my body is in the state that it is now. But –

I wouldn’t trade those days for anything!

Being retired also means the loss of income to cover the monthly bills for feed, hay, medicinal needs, etc. etc. Social Security seems to be pretty scant these days irrespective of all the blood, sweat and tears being spent within a period of 57 years of ‘working’ …. UGH!

So …

I work another “biz” to help keep this farm running and the critters fat and happy.

I “work” Pampered Chef.

Now, my ego has taken a hit over the last couple of years — “What !?!?!? Yeah. OK, so you used to be this big-shot horsewoman known all over the globe and now you’re selling pots and pans!!??” Um, yeah. I’m being brutally frank and honest here. I’m baring my soul. Because – just like when I was teaching people how to work with their aggressive or behaviorally-challenged 1200# beasts, I have to keep reminding myself that EGO needs to be simply taken out of the picture – entirely. If you’ve ever tried to do that you know the challenges it brings! Besides – “working” Pampered Chef means I get share and tout WHOLE HEALTH COOKING & LIVING which, for anyone who knows me, is where it’s AT! Yet, at the same time, I’ve learned to be the crazy, impetuous kinda gal I’ve always been but have, for ‘professional reasons’, hidden! Now I’m truly, 100% “me” and luvin’ it! (I’m actually luvin’ “me”! And that’s a first in my 71 years!)

My ‘mission’ is now to “inspire, encourage and support women of all ages who are struggling with authenticity and letting go of others’ expectations to simply and joyfully become the very best version of themselves.”

HOW? Through helping them get past their own limiting beliefs to the point where they KNOW that nothing is impossible when they put their minds to it AND, of course, when they hook up with God.

Yep — with God. For nothing is impossible for God.
Not even learning to love yourself.
And that’s the truth.

So, whether it’s working with them and the horses or working with them in the kitchen or working with them to start their own magnificent biz … I’m helping.

And that, my friends, is what I was born to do.

So come along with me as I grow this new chapter in my life (which may be the very last chapter – who knows?) … I’ll have LOTS TO SHARE with you about WHOLE HEALTH LIVING!!! Recipes, tips, tricks to make life FUN and profitable in some way at the same time … suggestions for healing your mind, bodies and spirits … with or without horses. In or out of the kitchen.

All with the solid foundation of hookin’ up with God and His Son and Spirit.
In an everyday way, that is …

‘Til next time – mucho Blessings and see ya on the flip side! STAY TUNED!

2022 SPRING – Here we come!

Blue skies, warm sun, new leaves on the trees, the smell of fresh grass and the sound of peepers in the ponds. New little critters adding to the wild sanctuaries in the woods and in the lazy little river here on PENZANCE – I couldn’t be MORE ready!

What about you? Are you ready?

With the imminent arrival of SPRING 2022 I am finally preparing to initiate the return calling of PENZANCE’s Womens’ Equine Assisted Ministry and Bible Studies.

For years PENZANCE was a sanctuary in Douglas, Massachusetts for women from all walks of life. A place to come to explore the peace of the Holy Spirit and the unconditional love that God has for each one of us. It was a place to grow, to develop new thoughts, make new friends (both equine AND human) and, well, – to experience the original meaning of the name Penzance,

“God’s Holy Headland; the place for Spiritual Growth”.

Now, in the “Quiet Corner” of Connecticut, in Canterbury, PENZANCE has been rehomed and renewed! The horses, ponies and donkeys are ready to meet some new friends and to get back to “work”. Although, we know that their ‘work’ is simply being who they are as God created them to be — our teachers.

But ask the animals, and they will teach you, or the birds in the sky, and they will tell you; or speak to the earth, and it will teach you, or let the fish in the sea inform you.” –Job 12:7-8

Hand stroking horse Loving touch - horse and the owner. Female hand stroking hors on the head. hugging  horse stock pictures, royalty-free photos & images

There is no riding the horses or ponies here (they are rescues and all have physical or emotional traumas that prevent them being put under a rider) BUT their simple presence, their very spirits can teach us so much of that unconditional love that our Father pours out on us – they exude our Father’s love and patience with us. Most times, the very simple act of merely sitting near them in the field allows our spirits to truly LISTEN to what Father is saying to us through His Word and through His presence. It allows us to tune in and HEAR His Word – that Word intended specifically for our own, individual spirits.

We read God’s Word.

We study and learn what He has for us during the time here.

We learn to worship and praise and sing and dance; or write and draw and paint and fully embrace ALL that God and His Son, His Holy Spirit, has for us – each in our own unique way.

Sometimes we simply sit in HIS presence and hear that still small voice that explodes our hearts and souls.

Groups, Semi-private and Individuals welcomed.

If you’d like to visit please send me a message for more information – m.me/gwenyth.santagate or text to me, 774-280-4227.

Are you ready?

I am.

In love and wonderment of our amazing Father … ❤️‍🔥

Don’t Give Up on Your Dream …

HORSELOVERS!
 
Never Give Up on Your Dreams! … are you a beginner horse lover over the age of 18 who has little to no horse experience and would like to learn the beginning foundations of horsemanship?
 
Or, perhaps you’ve not been around horses for years and would like to get connected with them again? Have you always wanted to learn “natural” and kind horsemanship – learning how they think and feel and how to relate to them on a higher level?
 
Are you an older or Senior Lady who would love to live out your little girl’s dream?
 
Having recently moved to Canterbury, CT we at PENZANCE Equine Integrative Solutions are now ready to accept private and semi-private appointments that cover the foundational aspects of horsemanship including handling horses, grooming, leading, controling the hooves, how horses think and equine behavior and much more.
 
No riding involved.
 
Private and semi-private sessions (1 – 1/2 hrs each sessons) and small groups (up to 4) 3 hr sessions.
 
A series of (3) sessions: Private $75 per session; Semi-private $50 pp per session. Groups $150 pp per 3-hr session (with 4 participants).
 
3 Session Program – Packages for 3 sessions paid in full at least 2 weeks prior to start of program – PRIVATE $195 Semi-private $140 pp, Groups $400 pp for (3) 3 hr. sessions. $50 of full payment non-refundable up to 1 week prior to start. Total unrefundable within 1 week to the start and after program begins.
 
WINTER sessions begin December 10th on Mons, Tues. and Fridays in Canterbury, CT.
 
In the case of inclement weather sessions are postponed to following week.
 
Contact Gwenyth Santagate at gwen.santagate@gmail.com or call (860) 556-9199 and leave message, please.
anotherplace

TRUTH MATTERS!

And this note I received last night from a client is WHY I do what I do!  Yes, truth matters – and the truth of the matter is that HORSES need to be HORSES!  Diet, Husbandry, Hoofcare … the WHOLE HEALTH of the WHOLE HORSE. We can’t just take a particular ‘piece’ of a horse and address that without having that ‘piece’ affect the WHOLE horse … Thank you, Lace, for keeping me updated and sending me this note last night. It made my heart so happy!!

Welp. I just got disowned by my first mentor who certified me in trimming. Not for changing the way i trim a bit, but because my horses are out on pasture and I’m feeding them a whole foods diet. In her words, “its irresponsible and she cannot condone such misguided advice for horses, let alone cushings/ir type.”
But i wanted to thank you again, because buck is better than he has ever been and he is so much happier. Fabio is doing great, he can run on gravel even though his hooves are not even close to being good. And my new girl is already debloating and I think her eyes are even less swollen today and its only been three days since i brought her home.
Her and two others like her were saved and are happy and galloping around because of you 🙂 i told my friend we could take a chance on this gelding who was dry lotted, fat, super lame, in shoes and worsening rotation. We took him and turned him out to pasture, did some very specific, barely noticeable trimming and in 6 weeks he was galloping around the pasture. Once that barn learned we fixed him another lady asked us to take her two who had the exact same problems. So we now have three registered rocky mountain horses for free who are sound and no longer in pain. These two we just got we had her farrier not touch since the last trim and they came sound a few weeks ago without her trimming, but they still had them locked up in small dry lots with alfalfa and salt blocks. And both have huge cresty necks, bulging eyes and those weird fat deposits in the shoulders and rump. The first one did too but not as bad and he looks amazing now.
Thanks to you, I now know the truth behind truly healthy, happy horses. It was hard for me to let go and feed Buck all these things that logically seem healthy and good, but had been brainwashed into believing they were culprits… how silly!
Anywho, thank you for being you and for standing up for the truth. –Lacelynn, Peoria, IL

If you would like to know more about my WHOLE HEALTH FOR THE WHOLE HORSE protocol please feel free to contact me via email:  gwen.santagate@gmail.com or calling 1+ 860-556-9199.  You can also find me on Facebook — shoot me a PM!

Time Flies ..

Holy Cow … time DOES fly!  It is now Autumn of 2018 and we are back in New England settling in to Canterbury, CT. It’s a beautiful, quiet agricultural town with friendly people and lots of critters. Weekly there’s a report of cows or goats or a pig or two or other farm critters that have wandered away from their farm. People don’t flinch at that — they just round ’em up and send ’em home again – back where they belong.

The photo above is our ‘back pasture area’ and the guys are luvin’ it. Plenty of green grass, trees, and we even have a river that ‘runs through it’ complete with dam and waterfall. Of course, the horses and ponies don’t have access to it but the best thing about it is … the barn and house are set so far up from the river that the chances of ever getting flooded from it are next to nothing. Praise God!  After being flooded out 5 times in FL, the last flooding the worst after Irma blew through, we’d had enough. So, we sold the farm down south and moved back to New England.  Guess there’s that saying … you can take the gal/guy out of New England but can’t take the New England out of the gal/guy. And, besides, we’ve reconnected with so many old friends it is, definitely, a ‘coming home again’ event and we’re enjoying the reconnections so much!

We’re luvin’ it … so far.

Now we’re getting ready for winter. Now THAT will be the tough part. However, we may be ‘old’ but we’re hardy and strong still. We’ll just throw a couple more logs into the stove and plan on feeding a few more bales of hay a day – make sure the water is still “water” and everyone’s healthy and snuggle down for a few months.

That brings us some ‘planning time’. Keep an eye on www.thepenzancehorse.com for events beginning next spring 2019. I’m still doing private and semi-private coaching, health and wellness for the ponies and horses as well as trimming a few hooves here and there on a regular basis AND …  I’m ministering/teaching at Blessings Farm in Charlton, MA a couple times a week. (Daily during the summer.) We’re planning some public workshops, clinics etc. for 2019. So, yeah … keep your eyes peeled. Oh … in the meantime, if you’re thinking of joining me at our PENZANCE Natural Hoofcare Workshop then you’ll wanna be ready by taking the Home Study Course, “Natural Hoofcare 101” online — in your own time and at your own pace with full support/coaching available as needed. Do this BEFORE coming for the Natural Hoofcare workshops so you’ll have all the ‘theory’ and ‘book work’ done prior to attending a PENZANCE Natural Hoofcare workship.

Anyhoo — Life is good and we are mightily blessed.

Hope to hear from you soon. 🙂

FEEDING RAW TO HORSES …

Found this article today from Rutgers … while I was looking for cites to back up raw, fresh forage feeding of horses – in particular, laminitic horses.

 

anything in bold italics and [ … ] are MY notes; not those from the author.

 

Sarah L. Ralston, VMD, Ph.D., dACVN, Department of Animal Science, Cook
College, Rutgers University

Fact Sheet #062 – Reviewed 2004

Horses are adapted to a diet based primarily of forages. Their digestive systems are geared toward the digestion of high roughage feeds that change slowly (for example, sudden access to a bag of grain or lush pasture after they have eaten only dry hay for the previous 5 months is likely to result in colic). However, with domestication, confinement, and modern technology, we are often confronted with horses that consume some really “odd” things with apparent relish. Feeding practices around the world differ and horses in other countries are commonly fed things that average American horse owners would never consider offering to their horses. For example, European horses are routinely fed silage, horses in Saudi Arabia munch happily on dried fava beans, and Irish horses are offered a weekly pint of ale or stout! With the above digestive constraints and variation in mind, what is presented here is by no means an exhaustive list of non-traditional things that might be consumed by horses. It is a list of things that horses have been reported to eat by veterinarians and horse owners around the world. Those that might adversely affect the horse’s health, and therefore be avoided or at least limited, are so identified.

 

Oddities often consumed by horses on pasture  [I do not consider these plants to be ‘oddities’ but a ‘staple’ for horses on pasture]
No problem, assuming fairly limited quantities and otherwise balanced ration:

Dandelion

Thistle (NOT Russian Knapweed or yellow star thistle–Centaurea spp)

Sunflower seeds and plant

Peanut plants

Raspberry/blackberry bushes

Wood/bark of most trees (NOT Prunus spp or black walnut or locust)

 

Potential problem if eaten in large quantities
Buttercup

Morning glory

Pokeweed

St. Johnswort

Gum-weed

Astragulus and Oxytropis spp/(vetches and locoweed)

Avocado leaves

Bracken fern

Most bulb type flowers (tulip, iris, etc.)

Wilted red maple leaves  [Red maple FRESH on tree are OK … still exercise caution. It is the WILTED leaves, especially those separated from the tree that are lethal. Brown, dead, crunchy leaves are no issue at all.]

Acorns/new oak leaves

 

Avoid at all costs (Lethal or severe toxicity potential)
Lily of the Valley

Larkspur

Tomato or potato plants

Rhubarb leaves and roots

Poison hemlock

Foxglove

Leafy spurge

Mustards

Jimsonweed

Alsike clover

Blue flax

Sorghum (Johnsongrass and Sudan grass)

Oleander

Privet

Japanese Yew (all Taxus spp)

Azalea

Rhododendron

Mountain Laurel

Pits of peaches, cherries, or avocados

Horsechestnut

Russian Knapweed or yellow star thistle–Centaurea spp

 

Potential Treats
Perfectly acceptable treats (fed in limited quantities(<1-2 lbs/feeding)

[Any one of these can be incorporated into a daily “salad” for a horse. See the base diet we use here on PENZANCE here…  http://www.tierneymissionbelize.org/thepenzancehorse/BASICDIETHANDOUT.pdf ]

Carrots, apples, grapes

Bananas

Peas

Green beans

Lettuce

Celery

Dried beans, such as pinto, red, fava (however should be cooked or heat treated)

Watermelon rinds

Squash

Mangoes (not the seeds)

Raisins

Bread/bagels/cake (NOT if they contain chocolate or poppy seeds)

Pasta, macaroni

Potato chips and potato products

Rice products (not raw rice)

Barley products

Corn products

Dairy products

Eggs

Fruit juices

Hot dogs, hamburgers, tuna fish, ham or even roastbeef sandwiches!

Most dog and cat foods

 

Beware large quantities, but probably acceptable in very small amounts (<2 to 4 ounces/day)

Cabbage, broccoli, kale, chard, collard greens, brussel sprouts [CABBAGE IS ESSENTIAL FOR THE HORSE THAT IS SUFFERING FROM ULCERS OR DEVELOPING ULCERS. Just a small handful of shredded cabbage a day will help turn around a horse with bleeding ulcers !!! in just 3 weeks. Scoped and veterinarian verified.]

Spinach

Rhubarb stems (NOT the leaves or roots)

Garlic and onions (large amounts may cause anemia) [https://fbresearch.org/coconut-and-onion-dewormers/ — BOTH garlic and onion are offer effective parasite control!  Combine with raw, virgin, organic coconut oil]

Turnips

Radishes

Avocado (NOT skins or seeds)

Lathyrus spp. beans (India)

Sunflower seeds

Sugar candies such as jelly beans, gummy bears, peppermints, etc.

 

Safe in very limited quantities BUT WILL CAUSE POSITIVE DRUG TESTS
Morning glory plants

Sassafras

Willow leaves and bark

Yucca

Tobacco (consumed, not inhaled)

Valerian root

Carrots in very large quantities only (over 5 lbs day)!

Persimmons (seeds also may cause impaction)

Chocolate in any form

Licorice?

Cinnamon products

Nutmeg

Hot pepper/chili flavored products (Nacho chips, etc)

Non-decaffeinated coffee or tea in any form

Caffeinated sodas

Alcoholic beverages?

Some dog/cat foods (Beware “bakery waste” as an ingredient-may contain chocolate)

 

Summary

There are obviously a wide range of things that our horses may enjoy consuming, not all of which are good for their health. Many horses would refuse to even sniff many of the items listed above. Knowing which potential treats are safe, at least in limited quantities, is important for horse owners. You never know what might be offered to your horse! For more information on signs and sources of toxicity the author recommends the following resources:

 

Reference

Lewis, Lon. 1995. Feeding and Care of the Horse, 2d ed.

Williams and Wilkins, Philadelphia, PA. Excellent chapters on toxic plants and feed induced diseases.
Toxic Plants Website: Excellent site with many links to other resources:http://www.ansci.cornell.edu/plants/plants.html.

 

REFERENCE:  http://esc.rutgers.edu/fact_sheet/odd-things-that-horses-eat/