Anytime Detox Juice

 

3 stalks kale
2 stalks celery
1 lime
1 apple
1 cucumber
1 drop Cilantro Essential Oil

The culinary uses and additional benefits of Cilantro have been documented for centuries. Cilantro promotes healthy digestion and acts as a powerful cleanser and detoxifier for the body.* Applied topically, Cilantro is very soothing and cooling to the skin, and it adds a fresh, herbal aroma to any essential oil blend when diffused. Cilantro’s culinary uses are endless, adding a flavorful twist to meats, salads, dips, and guacamole.

 

PS .. this can be made and drizzled over your horse’s “salad” for added health benefits. They LOVE this stuff!

Some Quotes from Master Horsemen and others …

“Horse training is about building confidence one step at a time. It’s not about confrontation or respect or being the boss or winning fights.” — Neil Davies

“New things must be introduced one step at a time. Remember, you’re building confidence, you’re not “desensitising”.” — Neil Davies

“When teaching your horse never increase the pressure unless you KNOW the horse understands what you want. Wait for the understanding then release the pressure and reward. Give the horse the time he or she personally needs to process your request and make sure your request is perfectly clear.” — Gwenyth Browning Jones Santagate

“Working horses is a little like being married. Sometimes you need to adjust and change your plan.” — Buck Brannaman

“Work with the horse, not against him. Always listen to what the horse is trying to say. And always think for yourself.” — Mark Rashid

“We all make mistakes and by doing so we discover something about our limitations, but if someone or some horse suffers from these mistakes, then we must do our utmost not to repeat them. May every rider strive for a better connection with his or her horse by observation, closer understanding, and patient groundwork. It matters not what discipline is pursued, only that there be a perfectly balanced union between the two—man and horse—so the two become one.” — Frederic Pignon/Magali Delgado

“One of the primary ways horses communicate with us is through their behavior. Again, it is my belief horses don’t distinguish between how they feel and how they act. So if they act a certain way, their actions are reflecting the way they feel. A horse’s body then becomes a mirror for their emotions. So the body informs us of what is truly going on internally.” — Mark Rashid

“Once I quit fighting with him and began rewarding his efforts to respond to my cues, he became extremely willing to do what I was asking. The fight and confusion just seemed to melt away,” — Mark Rashid

“Do you stop breathing when you pick up your reins?” — Leslie Desmond

“Consider yourself from your horses point of view. Not many people do that. But we should.” — Leslie Desmond

“You don’t take the journey. The journey takes you. “~”Travels in a Stone Canoe”, Harvey Arden & Steve Wall

“Listen to the horse. Try to find out what the horse is trying to tell you. All we are trying to do is fix things up to where he can find them; then it’s the horse’s idea.” ~ Tom Dorrance

“Horses are intelligent and they can make decisions. This is the reason that they can sense what a person wants them to do and will try to understand a person’s intent. Through his natural instinct of self-preservation, a horse will respond to two kinds of feel that a person can present. He will respond to a person’s indirect feel, which means that he will either react to or ignore a person’s presence – and how a horse responds depends entirely on the person. This indirect feel is what you have out in the pasture or corral, when you don’t have any physical contact with the horse, like a halter or snaffle bit. A horse will also respond to direct feel, which is when you have a physical connection with the horse through some part of your body, the halter or the snaffle, or a rope any place on his body, even if it’s connected to the saddle horn.” ~ Bill Dorrance

“Pride and ego get in people’s way, it gets in the horse’s way.” ~ Ray Hunt

“Horses don’t do wrong things – horses are never wrong.” ~ Ray Hunt

“I will not change my horse with any that treads but on four pasterns…When I bestride him, I soar, I am a hawk. He trots the air, the earth sings when he touches it, the basest horn of his hoofs is more musical than the pipe of Hermes…When bestride him I soar, I am a hawk…”
~ William Shakespeare

“For what the horse does under compulsion, as Simon also observes, is done without understanding; and there is no beauty in it either, any more than if one should whip and spur a dancer.” ~Xenophon

“God forbid that I should go to any Heaven in which there are no horses.”
~R. Graham

“A technique can have a “Here, horse, let me help you” feel behind it. Or it can have a, “You better do this or else” feel behind it. The feel behind the technique can be the factor that decides whether the technique is effective or not.” ~Mark Rashid

“It would take years to train Templado,” Pignon said. “He forgave me nothing. The slightest error, the slightest faux pas on my part, and I was made to pay dear.” Whether ‘man was training horse’ or ‘horse was training man’ was unclear, the result however was a new relationship was forged, horse and man as a collaboration of equals.” ~Frédéric Pignon, Cavalia

“Isness is the glorious state of God manifested in His entire creative spendor here and on all planes.” — Unknown

“It is the active form of being, more a becoming, an awakened journey carrying one towards the adventure of vibrant aliveness, L.I.F.E. (love in Finitie Expression) forever. “~Liz Mitten Ryan

“It’s all about what’s in your heart and how you use it.” — Jeanette Baldwin

“BREATHE!”  “EXHALE!” — Gwenyth Browning Jones Santagate

“Something we were withholding made us weak, until we found out that it was ourselves. ” ~Robert Frost

In Search Of …

I am in search of a partner.

Plain and simple.

A partner who is motivated, who can be committed and wants to help others in their quest for safer and more ‘natural’ solutions for their health, happiness and wellness while making some extra money doing so.

Someone who wants to make a real difference in the world around them.

Someone who wants to help others realize their dreams.

Someone who can be dependable, honest, be themselves and simply be …

A good partner.

Its fun ‘work’ (not really work at all!); you set your own hours and days; You get time to spend with your kids, your family; you work with others on my team who are especially enthusiastic and supportive – others who enjoy helping one another out and also on their own quest for natural health.

They are people who care. Truly care.

Do you?

Are you passionate about optimal REAL health for others? For their families, farms and critters?

Do you like helping other people?

Do you like to laugh and smile and have FUN?

Do you like to make money?

Would you like the opportunity for an UNCAPPED income?

Would you like to fire your boss?  *grin*

Well, if you answered yes to these questions and feel you meet my ‘strict’ criteria for a good partner then shoot me an email and let’s talk.

I’ll fill you in with more detailed information. We’ll chat a bit, laugh a bit, get to know one another and see if YOU can be my next partner.

Email to me now:  gwen.santagate@gmail.com and I’ll tell ya all about it.

Oh — and HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

 

THAT’S IT! I’VE HAD IT!

That’s it.
You’ve had it!
You’ve tried EVERYTHING.
Nothing’s worked.
Now you’re thinking of retirement for your best friend or … worse.

important

STOP!

For almost 2 decades I’ve been called in as a ‘last resort’ for horses with soundness issues, quirky health issues and behavioral issues* (since the 70’s)*. The individual treatments I’ve designed and used … WORKED! The following are just a few of the horses I’ve worked with …

Pegasus … Scheduled for euthanasia 17 years ago. Dx’d with Navicular Disease and dangerous attitude. Treated diet, herbs and hoofcare. Today still fully in work and healthy.

Lilly … Penetrating Founder. Devastating. Recovered fully. Cushings controlled with diet, herbs & homeopathy.
Libby … Abused rescue. PTSD. Recovered and loves her humans! PPT therapy.
Cisco … Severe PTSD due to aggressive training. Now a “pocket pony”. PPT therapy. ECBT.
Pepper … Dangerously aggressive.  Blind in one eye. PPT therapy. Rehabbed to faithful partner with his owner until complete blindness forced euthanasia.
Spirit … Anxious, Lame, Lyme Disease. Issues with gaits. Rehabbed with Bodywork, Diet, Homeopathy.
Whinney … Penetrating Founder. Recovered and back under saddle in under a year. Hoofcare, Diet, Herbs.
Ginger … Severe founder. Aged (34). Malnutritioned. Neglected. Brought back to full health and was exceptional ‘schooling horse’ until 40 years old.
Cheyenne … Wild Mustang. 6 auction houses and 5 owners in 2 1/2 years. (only a shy 4 yo.). Dangerously defensive from former mishandling and abuse. Now ‘pocket pony’. Homeopathy, Herbs, Diet, PPT, ECBT.
E’toile … undetermined severe lameness for 3+ weeks.  Abscess. Treated hoofcare and herbs. 100% recovery within a week.
Rira … Lyme. Treated homeopathically. 2 weeks all symptoms gone and back under saddle.
Curly … Cushings, IR. Homeopathy, Nutrition, Herbs. All symptoms of Cushings resolved.
Cody … Recurring Facial Abscess. 3 surgeries. Treated with homeopathics. 7 days and abscess resolved. Never returned.
Tammy … Colic. Treated homeopathically. Recovered in less than 1 hour.
Dorian … Recurring seasonal colic for 7 years. Treated homeopathically and nutritionally. Colic episodes resolved.
Misty … Cushings, IR, DSLD. Treated with homeopathics, herbs and nutritionally. Cushings and IR resolved. DSLD maintained until EOL.
Pony … Chronic lameness 3+ years. Hoofcare, Herbs, Diet. Fully recovered less than 8 weeks.

and hundreds more.

Have you “Had It!” ?
Email to me:  gwen.santagate@gmail.com and tell me what’s going on.

There is no financial obligation at this time.

Find out how YOU can help YOUR HORSE!

Tissue Salts for Senior Horses

TISSUE SALTS FOR SENIOR [HORSES]

(Adapted/Quoted) from Julie Anne Lee’s article on TISSUE SALTS FOR SENIOR DOGS, Original article.

WHAT ARE TISSUE SALTS?

“Tissue salts treat disease by supplying the body with deficient cell salts, the 12 inorganic compounds that make up the cell, thus assisting the body’s return to healthy functioning. This is based on a system developed by Dr Schuessler, a German 19th century physician, and the discovery around that time of the constituents of the cell. Dr Schuessler suggested that the cells of the body contain a balance of water, organic and inorganic constituents. Both the structure and vital functioning of the body are dependent upon the balance of these constituents, supplied by nature in both plant and animal tissue.

Healthy cells are essential for a healthy body. Tissue salts can be used to restore balance to the body’s cells. Although tissue salts are considered very mild and can usually be given with confidence, as with all homeopathic medicine, it’s important to stop using them if symptoms worsen. Tissue salts can cause an aggravation or healing crisis although improvement should occur once their use is stopped.

While tissue salts are more like a mineral supplement than a homeopathic potency, they should be given with care, then discontinued once healing has taken place.

READ MORE HERE:  http://thepenzancehorse.com/TISSUE%20SALTS%20FOR%20SENIOR%20HORSES.pdf

I do Life with Horses …

gwendiego2-300x269Today, 7 years ago on Facebook I wrote a note. It said —

“They are an integral part of *us* in terms of they have something to share with us each time we stroke them, smell them, see them — they are just like us only in ‘horse’ clothing. Learn to connect with your OWN horse and realize that you are on a path with your own horse that no one else can walk.” — Dec. 1, 2009

It was one of those paradigms … those life-changing moments when something really, I mean REALLY hits you. Yes, our horses are spirits in horse bodies – just like we’re spirits in human bodies. It was something that twisted and turned and smoothed out in the gut during contemplation. It now is the flowing base of my connection with any horse. It is truly amazing. Beyond words, way beyond the carrot stick and the bit and saddle. It is … life in spirit.

I do “life” with horses. They’ve been ‘life’ blood for me since before I was born, I believe. I just said it yesterday to my beloved sister – horses and the ocean … they’re both my blood and I no longer make excuses for that. There are no excuses. Nor should there have to be. As much as I need air to breathe I need horses and the ocean to be whole. No one questions why I need air. Why question, “Why horses?” Jesus made me that way – and HE knows. HE understands. I just wish it hadn’t taken me a lifetime to understand.

Yep, I do “life” with horses. I AM one with horses in spirit. It’s who I am.

Alternative Action: Treating Lymphangitis

“Swollen Leg Syndrome” is frustrating, but can be managed successfully.

by Holistic Horse Contributors
ask Holistic Horse

lymph4lateral

Lymphangitis in horse leg

“Swollen Leg Syndrome” is frustrating, but can be managed successfully.

INTRODUCTION

The lymphatics are a type of tubular system that drains excess fluids and proteins from tissue and gradually routes it back into the main blood circulation. Lymphatics are present practically everywhere in the body, but the most common place to encounter problems is in the legs of the horse.

Fluid in the lymphatics is dependent on movement, muscle contraction and pulsation of the blood vessels to keep it moving in the right direction. In some horses, standing idle for prolonged periods can lead to edema or swelling of the legs, often due to leakage of fluid from the lymphatics.

Some horses end up with chronic problems leading to intermittent stocking up or edema formation. As a veterinarian, I believe that managing the ongoing inflammatory process is critical for overall success. Through a combination approach, we can manage ongoing inflammation and modulate the immune response, which I feel is a major component to these conditions. — Tom Schell, DVM, www.curost.com

 

 lymphangitisillustration-rebeckablenntoft

THE EQUINE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM

Modern methods of keeping horses stabled, with limited time for free exercise and concentrated physical training sessions, create an unnatural pattern of movement. When a horse is standing still, the transport capacity of the lymphatic system decreases significantly. Both the velocity of flow and the total volume of lymph being moved will be reduced, putting the standing horse at a distinct disadvantage with regard to recovery from injury or exertion. The horse’s high number of lymph nodes (roughly 8000 compared to an average of 600 in the human) provides a greater propensity for lymphatic “bottlenecks” because lymphatic fluid slows down and concentrates upon entering each lymph node.

Notably, half of the horse’s 8000 lymph nodes are situated in the ascending colon. When access to ad lib forage is restricted, the horse’s lymphatic system is significantly compromised, as the lymph flow around the intestines is stimulated by the peristaltic action created from a continuous flow of food though the gut.

It is not unusual to see performance horses in their boxes almost permanently during the competitive season. A ration of hay or haylage given in the evening can be eaten up within a few hours, leaving the horse standing without food for up to 12 hours. The horse is then taken out for training exercise, whereby his lymphatic system is being asked to increase lymph flow from a compromised position very rapidly into a highly active state. Often horses are then returned to their stable still warm, and although the lymphatic system still has work to do in clearing cellular debris plus dealing with the consequential increase of arterial blood flow into the interstitium, it is not able to do so due to the return to inactivity.

It is therefore not surprising that many performance horses will develop swollen or filled legs as a result of lymphatic compromise. Many owners will try to reduce swelling by using elasticated stable bandages over some form of padding. However, this has been shown to simply transfer the edema via the superficial lymphatic system higher up the leg, where it gives the illusion of having dispersed. In 2006, a large veterinary study was undertaken in Germany to ascertain the effect of different types of bandaging on the lymphatic vessels. This involved injecting a continuous stream of contrast medium (dye) into the lymphatic vessels of horses under sedation and x-raying the effects. Horses bandaged with the elasticated stable bandages were found to have significantly impeded lymph flow when compared to those bandaged with specially designed lymphaticcompression bandages .

When one considers that every cell in the body relies upon receiving dissolved oxygen and nutrients from the interstitium to carry out its metabolic function properly, and that the lymphatic system collects cellular debris from the interstitium to filter and return it to the bloodstream, any disruption of the smooth functioning of the lymphatics will compromise cellular health. When the lymphatics are compromised (either by lack of movement, genetic predisposition, injury, surgery or post infection, such as in cases of lymphangitis), excess fluid within the interstitium will generally lead to edema forming ventrally to the abdomen, mammary glands or sheath, or distally to the limbs.

In horses, hind limbs will generally be more affected than front limbs due to the distance that the lymphatic fluid has to travel back along the thoracic duct to the superficial cervical lymph nodes and external jugular veins.

“Equine Lymphatic System”

Superficial Lymphatic Drainage Pathways of the Horse

Colored areas indicate skin territories, where lymph drains to a set of nodes within that territory. For example, territory III drains to the superficial cervical nodes shown as Lcs in the neck. If a horse has an injury to his lower foreleg, the lymph will drain upwards to that set of nodes. If a horse has an injury behind the ear, it will drain to the same nodes. The territories usually don’t allow lymph from one territory to another, but “watersheds” between them can allow lymph to pass if one area is overloaded. The white line shown running along the center of the spine and ventrally along the abdomen are absolute watersheds, and lymph cannot pass at all through those.

It’s important to note that the internal organs, bones, tendons and ligaments in each territory drain via the deep lymphatics to those same nodes. So the skin of territory I goes to the submandibular nodes under the jowl, but the teeth, bones, tongue, cartilage, etc. in territory I also drain to the submandibular. From there, the collected lymph goes back to the return point to the superficial cervical nodes (Lcs on the diagram). — Rebecka Blenntoft, blenntoftmld.com

LASER THERAPY

Therapeutic laser is used in human medicine to reduce the pain and swelling caused by edema in the lymphatics of the upper limbs, breast and neck, and it can effectively treat lymphangitis in our equine patients as well. Laser treatments modify the viscosity of the lymph, which helps the fluid to move more easily through the lymphatics.  It also softens the hard, fibrotic tissue which can provide a reduction in the volume of the edema in the limb, improving movement and flexibility. In addition to treating the bacterial infection, you can use the laser twice daily to treat the condition, delivering 3 joules/cm2 over all affected areas. You should also treat the lymph structures outside of the swollen tissue that are responsible for removing the fluid through the limbs. If the epidermis has become irritated and formed a crusty covering, reduce the dosage to 2 joules/cm2 around the crusted portion and maintain 3 joules in the remaining areas. Treating with the laser early in the process is recommended to reduce the fibrosis which can occur. There are no reported side effects from using laser treatment for this condition, and improvement is easy to measure and track. — Doreen Hudson,www.respondsystems.com

ESSENTIAL OILS

Essential oils are very effective in supporting the lymphatic system as they can improve the function of the circulatory system, aid in cellular detoxification and combat infection congruently. Cypress oil does all of these, reduces muscles spasms and nervous tension, and aids in digestion, making it a perfect oil for the barn. Other oil recommendations are Lemon and Grapefruit which most horses will lick right out of your hand. — Nan E. Martin, LSH-CRTS

HERBS

Robust immune and elimination systems should actively and positively discharge waste products of infection and inflammation. Lymphangitis is simply the result of this process not working efficiently. Less robust systems will try to function with a toxic load in the blood. Blood Cleanser Herbs include: Garlic, Elecampane, Echinacea, Nettle, Maritime Pine, Yarrow, Kelp, Violet Leaves, Horseradish, Horsetail, Red Clover and Rosehips along with the Bach Flowers Crab Apple and Rescue Remedy. A 12-week course is recommended, which is a full blood cycle. Adding Fenugreek and Rosehips to the feed as basic addition will ensure that the lymphatic system is well supported, as are kidneys. — Catherine McDowell, Herbalist

Herbal blends can help support your horse’s recovery from lymphangitis. Cleavers, calendula, fenugreek, violet leaves, and kelp aid your horse by stimulating the lymphatic system. Other herbs such as Echinacea help clear infection, while dandelion root and nettles help to drain the excess fluid. For anti-inflammatory and pain relief, devil’s claw or meadowsweet are good choices. Adding an herb that helps to balance immune function such as American Ginseng or another adaptogen would be beneficial. — Andrea Baldwin, Herbalist

HOMEOPATHY

Apis is a great homeopathic remedy for many cases of lymphangitis. The keynote for the use of the remedy Apis is significant swelling with lots of fluid under the skin, and the skin stretched tightly over the swelling, very similar as what a bee sting looks like. Lymphangitis creates a similar sort of swelling, where the skin becomes stretched over the fluid-filled leg. — Joyce Harman, DVM, MRCVS

KINESIOLOGY TAPE

Using kinesiology tape in Lymphangitis cases can be quite effective if you follow the correct protocols. The goal is to move collected fluid (blood flow and lymph) out of the affected area to reduce swelling (lymphadema). It is important to begin taping only after the initial infection is under control. — Dr. Beverly Gordon, www.Equi-Tape.com

ACUPRESSURE

Because there are three different types of lymphangitis (sporadic, ulcerative, and epizootic), varying in degrees of severity, follow the recommendations of your holistic veterinarian along with the acupressure session “Benefiting Lymphangitis”.

This session will help improve circulation, remove toxins, and reduce inflammation associated with this condition. — Amy Snow and Nancy Zidonis

MANUAL LYMPH DRAINAGE

Manual lymph drainage (MLD) is a light, painless therapy utilizing the power of the lymphatic system to treat a wide variety of conditions. MLD is able to move fluid from a region where the system isn’t functioning to one where it is. Very precise manual movements encourage tissue fluid to enter the initial lymph vessels and stimulate lymphatic contraction, greatly increasing the movement of lymph through the system. MLD is literally skin deep, working primarily with the superficial lymphatics. — Heather Powell, equinemld.com

 

OPPOSITE ILLUSIONS

What is the opposite of bucking? “Not bucking” you say? Nope, that’s not it. What is the opposite of “jigging”? Nope, wrong again. It’s not “not jigging”. What is the opposite of shoving? Hmmmm, “not shoving”? Nope … read on, my Friend. (Yep, its an oldie but goodie!)

Opposite Illusions

– Gwenyth Browning Jones Santagate © Aug 8, 2005
What is the opposite of bucking? “Not bucking” you say? Nope, that’s not it. What is the opposite of “jigging”? Nope, wrong again. It’s not “not jigging”. What is the opposite of shoving? Hmmmm, “not shoving”? Nope … read on, my Friend.

For every action there is a reaction and for every action there is a counterpart that is the opposite. The opposite of “bucking” would be walking forward. The opposite of shoving would be backing up. The opposite of jigging would be standing still or walking forward quietly. Instead of “punishing” an unwanted behavior in a horse why not think in terms of changing the negative behavior to a positive one and being able to reward your horse for doing something “right”. In essence, teaching the horse to do something else INSTEAD OF the offensive behavior? Give the horse a choice between the behaviors and making the “right choice” a rewarded experience. Sound pretty funky to you? Well, let’s take this scenario;

Susie has a 10 year old QH that is highly bred and extremely versatile. Susie has good riding background but limited ground training. (Notice that I said “Susie” has limited ground training vs. the horse having limited ground training!) … Roger, the QH, INSISTS on flying out the stall door whenever its opened, completely disregarding poor little Susie who tries desperately to stay out of his way yet at the same time, hang onto him. Susie’s trainer has suggested that everytime Roger begins to bolt out of the stall that Susie whack him on the chest with the crop. Susie’s TRIED to do this but Roger seems to be totally oblivious to Susie and her crop and manages every time to just keep on bargin’ through, dragging little Susie behind him. By now you’re thinking “I’d get a chain over that horse’s nose and that horse would learn a lesson or two!” Ah ha! What KIND of lesson would he learn? To be more respectful of Susie or the human standing in his way? Or would he learn to respond to pain, confusion, frustration and determination to get out of the stall and the experience even more quickly?

Horses naturally want to get along with their herd members. Part of their social interaction is learning to get along. Learning their own place within the herd and learning to respect those above them in rank. Horses are, by nature, gentle animals with extremely strong ideas about “fairness”. Doesn’t seem fair to me to punish Roger for barging out of the stall when all he wants to do is be a horse and get outdoors to move!

By whacking, or “punishing” Roger everytime he heeds his natural instinct as a horse without giving him a BETTER choice that helps him to stay safe and comfortable, Susie is doing nothing more than helping Roger build up his resentment and fear of humans and to learn to respond to a situation that gives him pain. So let’s think on this a bit. …

What could Susie DO, proactively, to 1. stop Roger from barging through and over her and 2. to keep Roger’s sensitive respect intact without adding fear or resentment to the equation? (You know that fear causes the horse to flight. That’s one of his primary behavioral standards.)

  1. Barging through and over human – represents lack of respect for one *supposedly* higher ranking. Represents the need to get out of confinement is greater than the need to be respsectful. Represents the “punishment” is not as strong of a stimulus as getting outside and responding to a natural instinctive call. — Issue of repecting higher ranking individual: Not the horse’s fault. Human needs to establish rank in a manner which the horse can understand. — Issue of the stronger instinctual behavior: There is no other motivator involved to override the instinctual need to get out of confinement. If confinement is associated with a pleasant experience that overrides the desire to leave, the horse will stick around! Food rewards, scritch rewards, etc. for a “right” behavior can override as motivators to initiate desired response in behaviors.

What is the opposite of barging? Standing still. Sub-Opposite behavior = waiting for appropriate cue to respectfully walk as leader requests.

Food as motivating behavior modification = MARKING the horse’s appropriate behavior at the INSTANT of that behavior then rewarding with a small enough tidbit as to motivate the horse to want more. (Please note that food rewards CAN be given from small bucket instead of hand if so desired. The transporter of the reward is not as important as the reward, itself.)

Bribery, you say? No. M-o-t-i-v-a-t-i-o-n. Every mammal needs motivation to execute a behavior. The level of motivation must exceed other motivators in strength in order to prompt behavior. In other words, would you rather “work” for a pat on the head or a homemade chocolate cookie? Personally, the chocolate chip cookie wins hands down for me!

How to teach the opposite of Barging … that is, standing still or stepping backwards

backwards away from human at stall door (better choice of behavior to teach)

Behavior desired = stepping backwards 3 steps when stall door is opened and waiting, respectfully, for human to request forward motion. Must break down the behavior as it is comprised of several “steps”. 1st step would be to step backwards instead of barging forward.

Set up a cue that you can use consistently when asking the horse to back up for you. Choose your “marker” of behavior, that is the audible sound you will use to indicate to the horse that it has executed the proper behavior. A mechanical clicker will work, a tongue click, a “kiss” sound, a “cluck” sound … a verbal Good! … whatever works for YOU but sound must be clear, crisp, short and easily identifiable by the horse. (I’ll use “click” just as the marker word for this article)

Begin teaching the horse what a marker is:

“click!” and give 1 or 2 Cheerios as “reward”. Repeat this process until your horse associates your marker sound with the reward. Now you’re ready to begin simple exercise of backing up 3 steps.

Ask horse to back up – use pressure and voice command. Instant the horse even thinks to back up, “click” and reward. Repeat several times until you’re receiving 100% result.

Ask horse to now actually move body backwards (vs. merely indicating he’s “thinking” about it) … give the cue to back and keep the pressure on the horse until he actually MOVES his body back one step. Click! Reward. Repeat until horse is responding 100%.

Now, do the same again but ask for 2 steps back. Then 3 and … now you’ve taught the horse the OPPOSITE of barging through you – you’ve taught him to respectfully back up 3 steps away from you! You’ve given him a CHOICE of behaviors to execute when you open that stall door. (Susie, this really isn’t difficult – just takes a bit of time and patience.)

Ready to teach him to stand still? (2nd part of the overall behavior that you’re trying to reach)

Now that you have the horse backing up, ask him “Whoa” … if he moves forward, ask him to back up and CLICK! and REWARD the second his stands without moving. Repeat and gradually request that he stand longer and longer until YOU say, “OK! Good job! NOW you may walk through the stall door!”

door!” … So now you’ve added more to the exercises by teaching the horse another opposite of “barging” behavior. You’ve taught him to stand still. Standing still is a CHOICE the horse makes which makes the behavior a decision and not an empty, thoughtless behavior.

Think of the difference between, “I’m not doing anything!” and … “I’m doing nothing.” Two completely different behaviors. “Doing nothing” is a decision based behavior. “I’m not doing anything” is a thoughtless, lacking in thought, of doing anything. So, the opposite of “I’m not doing anything” is … “I’m doing *nothing*.” In essence, I’m also saying that we’re teaching the barging horse to “do nothing” while standing quietly and waiting for his human to request forward movement. So, another “opposite” of barging would be to do “nothing”.

Whenever you’re working around a horse it is imperative to always think of the consequences of what YOUR behavior and requests will reap from the horse. Every action has a reaction. Our requests have reactions from the horse. They can be thoughtless reactions or they can be thought-FILLED choices that the horse makes.

Every action has an opposite. Think of the opposite actions that your horse chooses to execute today for you and start teaching him the proper action/behavior that you REALLY want.

Bucking? Move forward. Rearing? Move forward. Barging? Step back and wait. Jigging? Walk quietly. Doesn’t lift hoof? Lift hoof! Doesn’t lead? Give to pressure.

Think of your opposites and start working on them today. You’ll have a safer day and a much more pleasant relationship with your horse.

  1. Susie? If that’s you, drop me an email if you’re still getting “stuck” in front of your barging horse and I’ll see what I can do for you! Simply write to gwen.santagate@gmail.com!