WHOLE HEALTH FOR THE WHOLE HORSE LIVE EVENT

 

ASK LIVE QUESTION OR EMAIL PRIOR TO EVENT

TO: gwen.Santagate@gmail.com
www.thepenzancehorse.com
www.gwenythsantagate.com

Gwenyth Santagate is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

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THAT’S IT! I’VE HAD IT!

That’s it.
You’ve had it!
You’ve tried EVERYTHING.
Nothing’s worked.
Now you’re thinking of retirement for your best friend or … worse.

important

STOP!

For almost 2 decades I’ve been called in as a ‘last resort’ for horses with soundness issues, quirky health issues and behavioral issues* (since the 70’s)*. The individual treatments I’ve designed and used … WORKED! The following are just a few of the horses I’ve worked with …

Pegasus … Scheduled for euthanasia 17 years ago. Dx’d with Navicular Disease and dangerous attitude. Treated diet, herbs and hoofcare. Today still fully in work and healthy.

Lilly … Penetrating Founder. Devastating. Recovered fully. Cushings controlled with diet, herbs & homeopathy.
Libby … Abused rescue. PTSD. Recovered and loves her humans! PPT therapy.
Cisco … Severe PTSD due to aggressive training. Now a “pocket pony”. PPT therapy. ECBT.
Pepper … Dangerously aggressive.  Blind in one eye. PPT therapy. Rehabbed to faithful partner with his owner until complete blindness forced euthanasia.
Spirit … Anxious, Lame, Lyme Disease. Issues with gaits. Rehabbed with Bodywork, Diet, Homeopathy.
Whinney … Penetrating Founder. Recovered and back under saddle in under a year. Hoofcare, Diet, Herbs.
Ginger … Severe founder. Aged (34). Malnutritioned. Neglected. Brought back to full health and was exceptional ‘schooling horse’ until 40 years old.
Cheyenne … Wild Mustang. 6 auction houses and 5 owners in 2 1/2 years. (only a shy 4 yo.). Dangerously defensive from former mishandling and abuse. Now ‘pocket pony’. Homeopathy, Herbs, Diet, PPT, ECBT.
E’toile … undetermined severe lameness for 3+ weeks.  Abscess. Treated hoofcare and herbs. 100% recovery within a week.
Rira … Lyme. Treated homeopathically. 2 weeks all symptoms gone and back under saddle.
Curly … Cushings, IR. Homeopathy, Nutrition, Herbs. All symptoms of Cushings resolved.
Cody … Recurring Facial Abscess. 3 surgeries. Treated with homeopathics. 7 days and abscess resolved. Never returned.
Tammy … Colic. Treated homeopathically. Recovered in less than 1 hour.
Dorian … Recurring seasonal colic for 7 years. Treated homeopathically and nutritionally. Colic episodes resolved.
Misty … Cushings, IR, DSLD. Treated with homeopathics, herbs and nutritionally. Cushings and IR resolved. DSLD maintained until EOL.
Pony … Chronic lameness 3+ years. Hoofcare, Herbs, Diet. Fully recovered less than 8 weeks.

and hundreds more.

Have you “Had It!” ?
Email to me:  gwen.santagate@gmail.com and tell me what’s going on.

There is no financial obligation at this time.

Find out how YOU can help YOUR HORSE!

Alternative Action: Treating Lymphangitis

“Swollen Leg Syndrome” is frustrating, but can be managed successfully.

by Holistic Horse Contributors
ask Holistic Horse

lymph4lateral

Lymphangitis in horse leg

“Swollen Leg Syndrome” is frustrating, but can be managed successfully.

INTRODUCTION

The lymphatics are a type of tubular system that drains excess fluids and proteins from tissue and gradually routes it back into the main blood circulation. Lymphatics are present practically everywhere in the body, but the most common place to encounter problems is in the legs of the horse.

Fluid in the lymphatics is dependent on movement, muscle contraction and pulsation of the blood vessels to keep it moving in the right direction. In some horses, standing idle for prolonged periods can lead to edema or swelling of the legs, often due to leakage of fluid from the lymphatics.

Some horses end up with chronic problems leading to intermittent stocking up or edema formation. As a veterinarian, I believe that managing the ongoing inflammatory process is critical for overall success. Through a combination approach, we can manage ongoing inflammation and modulate the immune response, which I feel is a major component to these conditions. — Tom Schell, DVM, www.curost.com

 

 lymphangitisillustration-rebeckablenntoft

THE EQUINE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM

Modern methods of keeping horses stabled, with limited time for free exercise and concentrated physical training sessions, create an unnatural pattern of movement. When a horse is standing still, the transport capacity of the lymphatic system decreases significantly. Both the velocity of flow and the total volume of lymph being moved will be reduced, putting the standing horse at a distinct disadvantage with regard to recovery from injury or exertion. The horse’s high number of lymph nodes (roughly 8000 compared to an average of 600 in the human) provides a greater propensity for lymphatic “bottlenecks” because lymphatic fluid slows down and concentrates upon entering each lymph node.

Notably, half of the horse’s 8000 lymph nodes are situated in the ascending colon. When access to ad lib forage is restricted, the horse’s lymphatic system is significantly compromised, as the lymph flow around the intestines is stimulated by the peristaltic action created from a continuous flow of food though the gut.

It is not unusual to see performance horses in their boxes almost permanently during the competitive season. A ration of hay or haylage given in the evening can be eaten up within a few hours, leaving the horse standing without food for up to 12 hours. The horse is then taken out for training exercise, whereby his lymphatic system is being asked to increase lymph flow from a compromised position very rapidly into a highly active state. Often horses are then returned to their stable still warm, and although the lymphatic system still has work to do in clearing cellular debris plus dealing with the consequential increase of arterial blood flow into the interstitium, it is not able to do so due to the return to inactivity.

It is therefore not surprising that many performance horses will develop swollen or filled legs as a result of lymphatic compromise. Many owners will try to reduce swelling by using elasticated stable bandages over some form of padding. However, this has been shown to simply transfer the edema via the superficial lymphatic system higher up the leg, where it gives the illusion of having dispersed. In 2006, a large veterinary study was undertaken in Germany to ascertain the effect of different types of bandaging on the lymphatic vessels. This involved injecting a continuous stream of contrast medium (dye) into the lymphatic vessels of horses under sedation and x-raying the effects. Horses bandaged with the elasticated stable bandages were found to have significantly impeded lymph flow when compared to those bandaged with specially designed lymphaticcompression bandages .

When one considers that every cell in the body relies upon receiving dissolved oxygen and nutrients from the interstitium to carry out its metabolic function properly, and that the lymphatic system collects cellular debris from the interstitium to filter and return it to the bloodstream, any disruption of the smooth functioning of the lymphatics will compromise cellular health. When the lymphatics are compromised (either by lack of movement, genetic predisposition, injury, surgery or post infection, such as in cases of lymphangitis), excess fluid within the interstitium will generally lead to edema forming ventrally to the abdomen, mammary glands or sheath, or distally to the limbs.

In horses, hind limbs will generally be more affected than front limbs due to the distance that the lymphatic fluid has to travel back along the thoracic duct to the superficial cervical lymph nodes and external jugular veins.

“Equine Lymphatic System”

Superficial Lymphatic Drainage Pathways of the Horse

Colored areas indicate skin territories, where lymph drains to a set of nodes within that territory. For example, territory III drains to the superficial cervical nodes shown as Lcs in the neck. If a horse has an injury to his lower foreleg, the lymph will drain upwards to that set of nodes. If a horse has an injury behind the ear, it will drain to the same nodes. The territories usually don’t allow lymph from one territory to another, but “watersheds” between them can allow lymph to pass if one area is overloaded. The white line shown running along the center of the spine and ventrally along the abdomen are absolute watersheds, and lymph cannot pass at all through those.

It’s important to note that the internal organs, bones, tendons and ligaments in each territory drain via the deep lymphatics to those same nodes. So the skin of territory I goes to the submandibular nodes under the jowl, but the teeth, bones, tongue, cartilage, etc. in territory I also drain to the submandibular. From there, the collected lymph goes back to the return point to the superficial cervical nodes (Lcs on the diagram). — Rebecka Blenntoft, blenntoftmld.com

LASER THERAPY

Therapeutic laser is used in human medicine to reduce the pain and swelling caused by edema in the lymphatics of the upper limbs, breast and neck, and it can effectively treat lymphangitis in our equine patients as well. Laser treatments modify the viscosity of the lymph, which helps the fluid to move more easily through the lymphatics.  It also softens the hard, fibrotic tissue which can provide a reduction in the volume of the edema in the limb, improving movement and flexibility. In addition to treating the bacterial infection, you can use the laser twice daily to treat the condition, delivering 3 joules/cm2 over all affected areas. You should also treat the lymph structures outside of the swollen tissue that are responsible for removing the fluid through the limbs. If the epidermis has become irritated and formed a crusty covering, reduce the dosage to 2 joules/cm2 around the crusted portion and maintain 3 joules in the remaining areas. Treating with the laser early in the process is recommended to reduce the fibrosis which can occur. There are no reported side effects from using laser treatment for this condition, and improvement is easy to measure and track. — Doreen Hudson,www.respondsystems.com

ESSENTIAL OILS

Essential oils are very effective in supporting the lymphatic system as they can improve the function of the circulatory system, aid in cellular detoxification and combat infection congruently. Cypress oil does all of these, reduces muscles spasms and nervous tension, and aids in digestion, making it a perfect oil for the barn. Other oil recommendations are Lemon and Grapefruit which most horses will lick right out of your hand. — Nan E. Martin, LSH-CRTS

HERBS

Robust immune and elimination systems should actively and positively discharge waste products of infection and inflammation. Lymphangitis is simply the result of this process not working efficiently. Less robust systems will try to function with a toxic load in the blood. Blood Cleanser Herbs include: Garlic, Elecampane, Echinacea, Nettle, Maritime Pine, Yarrow, Kelp, Violet Leaves, Horseradish, Horsetail, Red Clover and Rosehips along with the Bach Flowers Crab Apple and Rescue Remedy. A 12-week course is recommended, which is a full blood cycle. Adding Fenugreek and Rosehips to the feed as basic addition will ensure that the lymphatic system is well supported, as are kidneys. — Catherine McDowell, Herbalist

Herbal blends can help support your horse’s recovery from lymphangitis. Cleavers, calendula, fenugreek, violet leaves, and kelp aid your horse by stimulating the lymphatic system. Other herbs such as Echinacea help clear infection, while dandelion root and nettles help to drain the excess fluid. For anti-inflammatory and pain relief, devil’s claw or meadowsweet are good choices. Adding an herb that helps to balance immune function such as American Ginseng or another adaptogen would be beneficial. — Andrea Baldwin, Herbalist

HOMEOPATHY

Apis is a great homeopathic remedy for many cases of lymphangitis. The keynote for the use of the remedy Apis is significant swelling with lots of fluid under the skin, and the skin stretched tightly over the swelling, very similar as what a bee sting looks like. Lymphangitis creates a similar sort of swelling, where the skin becomes stretched over the fluid-filled leg. — Joyce Harman, DVM, MRCVS

KINESIOLOGY TAPE

Using kinesiology tape in Lymphangitis cases can be quite effective if you follow the correct protocols. The goal is to move collected fluid (blood flow and lymph) out of the affected area to reduce swelling (lymphadema). It is important to begin taping only after the initial infection is under control. — Dr. Beverly Gordon, www.Equi-Tape.com

ACUPRESSURE

Because there are three different types of lymphangitis (sporadic, ulcerative, and epizootic), varying in degrees of severity, follow the recommendations of your holistic veterinarian along with the acupressure session “Benefiting Lymphangitis”.

This session will help improve circulation, remove toxins, and reduce inflammation associated with this condition. — Amy Snow and Nancy Zidonis

MANUAL LYMPH DRAINAGE

Manual lymph drainage (MLD) is a light, painless therapy utilizing the power of the lymphatic system to treat a wide variety of conditions. MLD is able to move fluid from a region where the system isn’t functioning to one where it is. Very precise manual movements encourage tissue fluid to enter the initial lymph vessels and stimulate lymphatic contraction, greatly increasing the movement of lymph through the system. MLD is literally skin deep, working primarily with the superficial lymphatics. — Heather Powell, equinemld.com

 

Detoxing Your Horses

Over the course of everyday life we ALL pick up toxins of one sort or another. It’s simply a fact of living in today’s world.

There’s alot of info out there in cyber-land about detoxing our selves but … do you ever think about your horses needing it?

They need to detox as much as we do.

Especially the young, the seniors and the not-so-well guys.

I use a natural, raw, naturally chelated mineral supplement for all of the members in my herd. This stuff is amazing in and of itself but … for detoxing?  The minerals will help detox along with a raw, fresh forage diet combined with various supportive therapies with essential oils, immuno-regulators (natural) and even the ‘lifestyle’ of the horse – the husbandry, exercise, handling, stress levels, etc – but also with HERBS for maximum effects. 

The following are some of the more effective herbs that can be added into the horses’ salads and minerals:

BASIL: Antifungal, antibacterial
BENTONITE CLAY-detoxes heavy metals while providing vital minerals (MONTMORILLONITE CLAY is the BASE of the minerals I referenced – even better than Bentonite!) 
DANDELION ROOT -increases bile which improves liver/kidney/gallbladder function
ECHINACEA-boosts immune response
FENUGREEK-helps flush the body and break up mucous/congestion while improving digestion
MILK THISTLE-flushes and heals the urinary tract, but specifically works on the liver
NETTLE-kidney and adrenal gland tonic that also provides a wide variety of nutrients
ROSEHIP-assists in cleaning bladder and kidneys, raises alkalinity level, promotes a healthy immune system
YARROW-promotes secretion of digestive enzymes. This herb is considered a healing herb
YELLOW DOCK-improves the flow of bile and digestive juices, increasing elimination from the body

The general rule of thumb for amounts to be given to standard sized horses from Hillary Page Self (founder of Hilton Herbs) is 32 gms a day (or just a tad bit more than 1 oz. daily)

REMEMBER — you’re trying to DETOX your horse so BE SURE that the herbs you purchase are ALL ORGANIC.

I do offer personal consults so if you’re thinking you’d like to get some further advice and help with this or with other challenges you may be facing with your horse, just holler at me.  You can contact me via email gwen.santagate@gmail.com or by telephone (239) 573-9687.  Leave a message if I am not able to pick up when you call. I’ll call you back as soon as I possible can. Promise!  😀

Healing Qualities of 18 Herbs

Arnica flowers: Can help treat physical trauma, bruises, strains, and occasional muscle pain. Use immediately after strenuous exertion or injury to prevent, relieve, and reduce swelling, bruises and pain.

Burdock root: For skin infections.

Calendula flowers: Wonderfully healing with all-around healing properties useful for a wide variety of skin irritations and conditions including wounds, insect bites, rashes, scrapes, abrasions, cuts, and much more. Suitable for sensitive skin and babies.

Cayenne Pepper: Warming, good for occasional sore muscles, alleviates occasional pain, and itching.

Chamomile flowers: Minor abrasions, cuts, scrapes, and wounds.

Chickweed: Soothing, helps with skin conditions, minor burns, and other skin irritations.

Comfrey leaf and/or root: Relieves occasional pain, swelling, supports muscle, cartilage, and bone. Assists with healing a wide variety of conditions.

Echinacea herb and/or root: Beneficial for minor sores, wounds, insect bites, and stings.

Ginger root: Warming, use for occasional sore muscles.

Goldenseal leaf and/or root: Useful for treating minor wounds and skin conditions.

Lavender flowers: Soothing, calming, relieves occasional pain, has healing properties beneficial for minor wounds and numerous skin conditions.

Myrrh Gum powder: Used for cuts, scrapes, scratches, and abrasions.

Nettle leaf: An effective herb for many skin conditions.

Oregon Grape root: Skin disinfectant for minor wounds.

Plantain leaf: Helps speed the recovery process, relieves and soothes insect bites and stings, poison ivy, itching, minor sores, bruises, blisters, and damaged skin.

St. John’s Wort: Craft the deep red-colored oil from fresh flowers. Beneficial for minor wounds, cuts, bruises, insect bites and stings, nerve support, scrapes, and minor burns.

Thyme: Used for cuts, scrapes, and occasional sore muscles.

Yarrow Flowers: Apply to bruises, minor wounds, cuts, scrapes, and areas with swelling and bleeding.

BENEFITS OF ROSEMARY HERB

Some of the most interesting and unique health benefits of rosemary include its ability to boost memory, improve mood, reduce inflammation, relieve pain, protect the immune system, stimulate circulation, detoxify the body, protect the body from bacterial infections, prevent premature aging, and heal skin conditions.


Rosemary

Native to the Mediterranean region, rosemary is one of the most commonly found herbs in a spice ra
ck, and for good reason – not only does it have a wonderful taste and aroma, but also a wealth of beneficial health effects if regularly added to our diet. The scientific name of this perennial woody herb is Rosmarinus officinalis, but the world knows it by its common name. Similar to many other useful herbs, rosemary is in the same taxonomic family as mint, but doesn’t have that characteristic flavor. Rosemary has a warmer, bitter, and more astringent taste that gives wonderful flavor to soups, sauces, stews, roasts, and stuffing. It is particularly prevalent in Italian cultural cuisine.

Although small amounts like those used to flavor food aren’t typically considered large enough to have a major effect on the body, regular addition of the leaves to your food will allow your body to derive accumulated benefits from the organic compounds and unique phytochemicals present in the leaves. There are also uses of rosemary that involve consuming larger quantities or applying the essential oils from rosemary onto the skin directly. You can find out all about the health benefits of rosemary essential oil in its respective article here on Organic Facts. Now, let’s take a more detailed look at the health benefits of rosemary.

 

Health Benefits of Rosemary

Memory Booster: One of the earliest reported or documented uses of rosemary for health reasons was as a cognitive stimulant. It was said to improve memory and help to increase intelligence and focus. While many of those claims are still being researched and studied, its effects on the brain do indicate an increase in memory retention, which is never a bad thing; keeping your mind quick will help to keep it young. In that same vein, rosemary has been linked to stimulating cognitive activity in the elderly, as well as those suffering from more acute cognitive disorders, such as Alzheimer’s or dementia. This is an exciting alternative or supplement to more modern treatment for these as yet uncured conditions.

Mood and Stress: The aroma of rosemary alone has been linked to improving mood, clearing the mind, and relieving stress in those with chronic anxiety or stress hormone imbalances. When the plant is consumed or applied topically in some sort of salve of the leaves, it can have similar effects. Aromatherapy also uses rosemary essential oil for this purpose, but that concentration of active components isn’t necessary to have positive effects on stress and mood.

Immune System Strength: The active components in rosemary are antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-carcinogenic in nature. This represents a three-pronged attack against many different diseases and pathogens that could threaten the immune system or damage the integrity of the body. Antioxidant compounds form a secondary line of defense behind the body’s own immune system, and rosemary contains a significant amount of those powerful compounds, including rosmarinic acid, caffeic acid, betulic acid, and carnosol.

Antibacterial Potential: While the general immune boosting qualities of rosemary are impressive enough, it is specifically powerful against bacterial infections, particularly those in the stomach. H. pylori bacteria is a common and very dangerous pathogen that can cause stomach ulcers, but rosemary has been shown to prevent its growth when consumed. Similarly, rosemary is linked to preventing Staph infections, which kill thousands of people each year.

Stomach Soother: Rosemary has traditionally been used by dozens of cultures as a natural remedy for upset stomachs, constipation, bloating, diarrhea, and everything in between. Its anti-inflammatory and stimulant effects are largely the cause of these effects, so adding rosemary to your weekly diet can quickly help you regulate your bowel movements and your gastrointestinal system.
Breath Freshener: As a natural antibacterial agent, rosemary works as a wonderful breath freshener that also improves your oral health. Steep rosemary leaves in a glass of hot water and then gargle or swish the water in your mouth to eliminate bacteria and give you naturally fresh and clean breath all night!

Stimulate Blood Flow: Rosemary acts as a stimulant for the body and boosts the production of red blood cells and blood flow. This helps to oxygenate vital organ systems and areas of the body, ensuring that the metabolic activities in those areas are running smoothly, in addition to stimulating the movement of nutrients to cells that require repair.

Pain Relief: As an analgesic substance, rosemary has been topically applied in a paste or salve for hundreds of years to the affected area of the pain. When consumed orally, rosemary acts as a pain reliever for harder to reach spots, such as headaches and pain from a condition. In fact, one of the most popular uses of rosemary is for the treatment of migraines. Applying a decoction to the temples, or simply smelling the aroma of rosemary has been linked to reducing the severity of migraine symptoms.

Anti-Inflammatory Qualities: Perhaps the most important function of rosemary is as an anti-inflammatory agent in the body. Carnosol and Carnosic acid are two powerful antioxidant and anti-inflammatory compounds found in rosemary that have been linked to reducing inflammation of muscles, blood vessels, and joints. This makes rosemary an effective treatment for many things, including blood pressure, gout, arthritis, and injuries sustained during physical exertion or surgery. Rosemary is effective in oral or topical form for these anti-inflammatory effects. Furthermore, the reduction in inflammation in the cardiovascular system can help to boost heart health and prevent atherosclerosis from appearing.

Detoxify the Body: Rosemary is slightly diuretic in nature, meaning that it can help flush out toxins more efficiently during urination. Furthermore, by increasing the rate at which water leaves the body, it can also help push out pathogens, salts, toxins, and even excess fat when consumed regularly (or when you’re feeling particularly “toxified”). In terms of the particular organ it benefits, rosemary has been linked to lower levels of cirrhosis and a faster healing time of the liver, which is one of the slowest organs to heal.

Skin Health: The anti-aging properties of rosemary are quite well known. Although more commonly thought of in the essential oil form, the leaves of rosemary can also effect the skin internally or topically, and has been shown to improve the youthful quality of the skin, while also healing blemishes and increasing the natural shine and hydrated appearance of your body’s largest organ.


Article shared from: https://www.organicfacts.net/health-benefits/herbs-and-spices/rosemary.html

The Cushings Horse

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While most are advised to feed the Cushings horse a specialized formulated no sugar/low carb feed, I believe that doing so can actually be detrimental to your horse’s health. Processed feeds are known to be a causative factor in Insulin Resistance and EMS.

My own Cushings horse doesn’t get any processed feeds. He gets RAW vegetables, fruits, nuts and seeds as well as an organic, whole feed.   He’s shedding out nicely, has a good attitude, good energy and is putting on the healthy weight and muscle he needs.

He also gets organic Chaste Tree Berry along with a daily homeopathic regime proven to help resolve the Cushings condition 

Check out what Dr. DePaolo has to say about it.

 

14 Medicinal Herbs You Can Grow

violets

Here’s an A to Z guide to the medicinal herbs that relieve common ailments like indigestion, stress, anxiety, sunburn, headaches, coughs, colds, and more.

From Reader’s Digest online … SLIDESHOW!

Doesn’t matter if you live in an apartment or on a suburban lot … and of course, you can grow these if you’re on a farm … container gardening is a great way to make a nice, productive healing herbal garden.  Most of them can be grown INDOORS with plenty of sunlight fairly easily, too!

In this slide show from Reader’s Digest you’ll find some simple plants to grow listed with their particular properties.   Enjoy!

http://www.rd.com/health/conditions/medicinal-herbs/1/

Dandelions!

Dandelion

What an awesome weed!  BUT WAIT …  “weed?” you say. “I’ve spent hundreds of hours trying to get RID of all the dandelions in my yard! and now you’re telling me how awesome it is !?”

YEP.  Sure am!

Take a look at the health benefits of Dandelions from organicfacts.net …


Health Benefits of Dandelions

The health benefits of dandelions include the following:

Bone Health: Dandelions are rich in calcium, which is essential for the growth and strength of bones, and they are rich in antioxidants like vitamin-C and Luteolin, which protect bones from age-related damage. This inevitable damage is often due to free radicals, and is frequently seen as bone frailty, weakness, and decreased density.

Liver Disorders: Dandelions can help the liver in many ways. While the antioxidants like vitamin-C and Luteolin keep the liver functioning in optimal gear and protect it from aging, other compounds in dandelions help treat hemorrhaging in the liver. Furthermore, dandelions aid in maintaining the proper flow of bile, while also stimulating the liver and promoting digestion. Proper digestion can reduce the chances of constipation, which in turn reduces the risk of more serious gastrointestinal issues.

Diabetes: Dandelion juice can help diabetic patients by stimulating the production of insulin from the pancreas, thereby keeping the blood sugar level low. Since dandelions are diuretic in nature, they increase urination in diabetic patients, which helps remove the excess sugar from the body. Diabetics are also prone to renal problems, so the diuretic properties of dandelion can help removing the sugar deposition in the kidneys through increased urination. Furthermore, dandelion juice is slightly bitter to taste, which effectively lowers the sugar level in the blood, as all bitter substances do. Consistently lower blood sugar and a more regulated system of insulin release prevents dangerous spikes and plunges for diabetic patients, so dandelion extracts can be a perfect solution!

Urinary Disorders: Dandelions are highly diuretic in nature, so they help eliminate deposits of toxic substances in the kidneys and the urinary tract. The disinfectant properties of dandelions also inhibit microbial growth in the urinary system. In fact, the diuretic properties of dandelions are so strong that in France, the flower is also called “pissenlit”  which means “urinate in bed”.

Skin Care: Dandelion sap, also known as dandelion milk, is useful in treating skin diseases which are caused by microbial and fungal infections. This treatment stems from the fact that the sap is highly alkaline and has germicidal, insecticidal and fungicidal properties. You should be careful while using this sap, and avoid any contact with the eyes. This sap can be used on itches, ringworm, eczema, and other skin conditions without the risk of side effects or hormonal disturbances commonly caused by pharmaceutical skin treatments.


Acne:
Dandelion juice is a good detoxifier, diuretic, stimulant and antioxidant. These four properties make it a great treatment for acne. Before we know how it treats acne, we must know what causes it. Acne typically arises during the teenage years, when the body undergoes many physiological and hormonal changes. The flood of new hormones that bring about the changes in the body must be regulated, but if they don’t remain at a healthy ratio, they tend to deposit somewhat toxic substances into the body. These toxins tend to come out along with sweat through the sweat glands or sebaceous glands on the skin.

During these hormonal changes, these glands secrete more oils which, when mixed with dead skin, block the pores and the secretion of toxins is obstructed. Therefore, the toxic substances cannot escape and eventually result in acne. This situation is exacerbated by the microbial infections on the effected places. Dandelion juice, being a stimulant, diuretic and detoxifier in nature, can help regulate proper secretion of hormones, increase sweating and widen the pores. All of these factors help to facilitate the removal of toxins through sweat and urine. Furthermore, dandelion sap, if externally applied to areas with acne, can inhibit microbial infection and reduce the frustrating signs of acne. Also, it can speed up healing due to its vitamin-C content, so the scars and ugly red inflammation that traditionally follows acne treatment will be less noticeable.

Weight Loss: Our urine consists of up to 4% fat, so the more we urinate, the more water and fats are lost from the body. Dandelions, being diuretic in nature, promotes urination and thereby helps lose the dreaded “water weight” without causing any side effects. Furthermore, dandelions are low in calories, like most leafy greens, but for the small expense of calories (~1oo cal./4 cups), you get a huge amount of beneficial side effects. This is also why dandelions are sometimes used as sweeteners, because they are not packed with unhealthy sugars.

Cancer: Dandelions are high in antioxidants, such as vitamin-C and Luteolin, which reduce the free radicals (major cancer-causing agents) in the body, thereby reducing the risk of cancer. It also detoxifies the body, which further helps protect from the development of tumors and various cancers. Luteolin actually poisons essential components of cancer cells when it binds to them, rendering them ineffective and unable to reproduce. This characteristic has been demonstrated most notably with prostate cancer, although there are other studies being done.

Jaundice: Jaundice is primarily a disorder of the liver in which the organ starts overproducing bile, which ultimately enters the bloodstream and wreaks havoc on the body’s metabolism. The excess bile is also reflected through color of the skin, and eyes, which typically develop a yellow tint. The treatment of jaundice includes three main steps. First, you need to curb the production of bile. Second, you must remove the excess bile from the body, and third, you have to fight the underlying viral infection.

Dandelions are very helpful in all of these steps. It promotes liver health and regulates bile production. Being diuretic in nature, it promotes urination, where the excess bile can be eliminated. Finally, as an antioxidant and disinfectant due to the presence of vitamin-C and Luteolin, it fights viral infections as well. It is most beneficial when taken with sugarcane juice, since it replaces the sugar in the body that is significantly lowered due to the impact of excess bile. A lack of sugar can cause extreme fatigue and weakness, so dandelions help boost your energy levels after infection!

Gall Bladder Disorders: Dandelions are very beneficial for the gall bladder and liver, because they improve their general functioning, protects them from ill effects of oxidants and infections, and regulates the various secretions from both organs.

dandelionConstipation: Certain components of dandelion, namely the high levels of dietary fiber, make it abeneficial aid for digestion and proper intestinal health. Dietary fiber stimulates healthy bowel movements by adding bulk to stool, and also reduces chances of constipation as well as diarrhea. It regulates bowel movements, which can prevent more serious gastrointestinal issues. It is commonly prescribed for children who are experiencing constipation, as it is relatively soothing on the stomach. It has also been used to stimulate the appetite, particularly following trauma or surgery.

Anemia: Dandelions have relatively good levels of iron, vitamins, and protein content. While iron is the integral part of hemoglobin in the blood, vitamins like vitamin-B and protein are essential for the formation of red blood cells and certain other components of the blood. This way dandelion can help anemic people keep their condition in check.

High Blood Pressure: Urination is an effective way of lowering blood pressure. In fact, most of the modern medicines for lowering blood pressure are based on this phenomenon. Dandelion juice, being diuretic in nature, increases urination, both in quantity and frequency. Therefore, it helps lower high blood pressure. The fiber in dandelion is also helpful in reducing cholesterol and thereby assists in lowering blood pressure, since cholesterol is one of the factors that increases blood pressure. Finally, there is the high potassium content of dandelions, which is very effective in lowering blood pressure by replacing sodium.

Other Benefits: Dandelions can also be used as a vegetable and is a good source of fiber. It promotes digestion, and in the past, it was used to treat scurvy, because of its high levels of vitamin-C. It also has healing effects on dyspepsia, infections in the stomach, intestines and urinary system.

A Few Words of Warning: Dandelions can be helpful to diabetics by lowering blood sugar, but for patients already taking blood-sugar modulators, this can result in hypoglycemia, an equally dangerous condition. Consult your doctor before adding dandelion supplements on top of your normal treatment. Also, the milk sap of dandelions has been known to cause itchiness, irritation, or allergic reactions on the skin, and should be kept away from the eyes. Finally, there is a rare type of fiber in dandelions called inulin, and some people have a predisposed sensitivity or allergy to it which can be quite severe. When first adding dandelion greens to your diet in any way, start small and closely monitor your body’s response.

Other than that, pick some delicious dandelion greens and get healthy!


Isn’t that AWESOME???  And don’t forget … YOUR HORSE LOVES DANDELIONS, too!  So be sure to add some dandelions daily to your horses’ diets.  Most of the attributes listed above also apply to horses. So NO MORE DIGGING OUT DANDELIONS FROM YOUR YARD!

Nurture them for HEALTH!  😀

 

 

NOT JUST A WEED!

PURSLANE

purslane

Purslane, also known as Portulaca oleracea, is considered a common weed to many that may even be growing in your garden right now, without your explicit invitation.

It started its cultivation in India and Persia, and spread to the rest of the world. Some cultures pluck it out and throw it away with leaf clippings and other weeds, while others cultivate it specifically to eat as food.

Purslane is an aesthetically attractive weed with fleshy leaves and often yellow flowers, but its health benefits are even more desirable.

Power-Packed Purslane

Common in our yards but little known in the North American kitchen, purslane is both delicious and exceptionally nutritious. Common purslane (Portulaca oleracea) — also known as duckweed, fatweed, pursley, pussley, verdolagas and wild portulaca — is the most frequently reported “weed” species in the world. It can grow anywhere that has at least a two-month growing season.

Until recently, most research on purslane has focused on its eradication. A frequently overlooked approach to controlling this weed is to eat it! Purslane is so surprisingly tasty, North Carolina market gardener Patryk Battle says, “I have rarely had anybody not buy purslane after they’ve tried it.”

Purslane is somewhat crunchy and has a slight lemony taste. Some people liken it to watercress or spinach, and it can substitute for spinach in many recipes. Young, raw leaves and stems are tender and are good in salads and sandwiches. They can also be lightly steamed or stir-fried. Purslane’s high level of pectin (known to lower cholesterol) thickens soups and stews.

Battle also uses purslane in pesto. He throws basil and purslane (upper stems and all) into a blender or food processor, adds a small amount of olive oil, garlic, pine nuts and enough hot water to get a good consistency. Because it’s so juicy, purslane helps create a low-fat pesto without too much oil.

[via motherearthnews.com]