WHOLE HEALTH FOR THE WHOLE HORSE LIVE EVENT

 

ASK LIVE QUESTION OR EMAIL PRIOR TO EVENT

TO: gwen.Santagate@gmail.com
www.thepenzancehorse.com
www.gwenythsantagate.com

Gwenyth Santagate is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: https://zoom.us/j/611370332

Or iPhone one-tap (US Toll): +14086380968,611370332# or +16465588656,611370332#

Or Telephone:
Dial: +1 408 638 0968 (US Toll) or +1 646 558 8656 (US Toll)
Meeting ID: 611 370 332
International numbers available: https://zoom.us/zoomconference?m=S6vLAfgwCDVBAbNgwvL3Mv1i2yKSoUpS

 

Anytime Detox Juice

 

3 stalks kale
2 stalks celery
1 lime
1 apple
1 cucumber
1 drop Cilantro Essential Oil

The culinary uses and additional benefits of Cilantro have been documented for centuries. Cilantro promotes healthy digestion and acts as a powerful cleanser and detoxifier for the body.* Applied topically, Cilantro is very soothing and cooling to the skin, and it adds a fresh, herbal aroma to any essential oil blend when diffused. Cilantro’s culinary uses are endless, adding a flavorful twist to meats, salads, dips, and guacamole.

 

PS .. this can be made and drizzled over your horse’s “salad” for added health benefits. They LOVE this stuff!

In Search Of …

I am in search of a partner.

Plain and simple.

A partner who is motivated, who can be committed and wants to help others in their quest for safer and more ‘natural’ solutions for their health, happiness and wellness while making some extra money doing so.

Someone who wants to make a real difference in the world around them.

Someone who wants to help others realize their dreams.

Someone who can be dependable, honest, be themselves and simply be …

A good partner.

Its fun ‘work’ (not really work at all!); you set your own hours and days; You get time to spend with your kids, your family; you work with others on my team who are especially enthusiastic and supportive – others who enjoy helping one another out and also on their own quest for natural health.

They are people who care. Truly care.

Do you?

Are you passionate about optimal REAL health for others? For their families, farms and critters?

Do you like helping other people?

Do you like to laugh and smile and have FUN?

Do you like to make money?

Would you like the opportunity for an UNCAPPED income?

Would you like to fire your boss?  *grin*

Well, if you answered yes to these questions and feel you meet my ‘strict’ criteria for a good partner then shoot me an email and let’s talk.

I’ll fill you in with more detailed information. We’ll chat a bit, laugh a bit, get to know one another and see if YOU can be my next partner.

Email to me now:  gwen.santagate@gmail.com and I’ll tell ya all about it.

Oh — and HAPPY NEW YEAR!!!

 

THAT’S IT! I’VE HAD IT!

That’s it.
You’ve had it!
You’ve tried EVERYTHING.
Nothing’s worked.
Now you’re thinking of retirement for your best friend or … worse.

important

STOP!

For almost 2 decades I’ve been called in as a ‘last resort’ for horses with soundness issues, quirky health issues and behavioral issues* (since the 70’s)*. The individual treatments I’ve designed and used … WORKED! The following are just a few of the horses I’ve worked with …

Pegasus … Scheduled for euthanasia 17 years ago. Dx’d with Navicular Disease and dangerous attitude. Treated diet, herbs and hoofcare. Today still fully in work and healthy.

Lilly … Penetrating Founder. Devastating. Recovered fully. Cushings controlled with diet, herbs & homeopathy.
Libby … Abused rescue. PTSD. Recovered and loves her humans! PPT therapy.
Cisco … Severe PTSD due to aggressive training. Now a “pocket pony”. PPT therapy. ECBT.
Pepper … Dangerously aggressive.  Blind in one eye. PPT therapy. Rehabbed to faithful partner with his owner until complete blindness forced euthanasia.
Spirit … Anxious, Lame, Lyme Disease. Issues with gaits. Rehabbed with Bodywork, Diet, Homeopathy.
Whinney … Penetrating Founder. Recovered and back under saddle in under a year. Hoofcare, Diet, Herbs.
Ginger … Severe founder. Aged (34). Malnutritioned. Neglected. Brought back to full health and was exceptional ‘schooling horse’ until 40 years old.
Cheyenne … Wild Mustang. 6 auction houses and 5 owners in 2 1/2 years. (only a shy 4 yo.). Dangerously defensive from former mishandling and abuse. Now ‘pocket pony’. Homeopathy, Herbs, Diet, PPT, ECBT.
E’toile … undetermined severe lameness for 3+ weeks.  Abscess. Treated hoofcare and herbs. 100% recovery within a week.
Rira … Lyme. Treated homeopathically. 2 weeks all symptoms gone and back under saddle.
Curly … Cushings, IR. Homeopathy, Nutrition, Herbs. All symptoms of Cushings resolved.
Cody … Recurring Facial Abscess. 3 surgeries. Treated with homeopathics. 7 days and abscess resolved. Never returned.
Tammy … Colic. Treated homeopathically. Recovered in less than 1 hour.
Dorian … Recurring seasonal colic for 7 years. Treated homeopathically and nutritionally. Colic episodes resolved.
Misty … Cushings, IR, DSLD. Treated with homeopathics, herbs and nutritionally. Cushings and IR resolved. DSLD maintained until EOL.
Pony … Chronic lameness 3+ years. Hoofcare, Herbs, Diet. Fully recovered less than 8 weeks.

and hundreds more.

Have you “Had It!” ?
Email to me:  gwen.santagate@gmail.com and tell me what’s going on.

There is no financial obligation at this time.

Find out how YOU can help YOUR HORSE!

What!? No Farms and No Distilling?

lavender

 

 

 

 

 

I read this little remark on a website the other day:

It was under “CONS” against doTERRA Essential Oils

  • They do not have their own farms for growing plants for essential oils and do not distill the plants for oils

ACTUALLY, that is a PRO doTERRA because —

The essential oils from doterra are co-sourced from the plants’ indigenous regions in the world. Meaning, the plants grow in their natural environment and, as such, the oils from these plants are going to be of the best and highest quality and strength found anywhere. Plus — they will be MORE than organic! Cause they are ‘natural’ and as pure as nature provides.

Plants grown on a farm that is foreign to their native landscape have to be fertilized and enhanced and encouraged to grow. The products produced from the farmed plants can only be inferior to those which grow naturally.

Survival of the fittest … in the wild, the plants that are the strongest and healthiest are going to be the ones that produce strong, healthy seeds for the next generation of plants.

So it is only ‘natural’ that the oils derived from such strong, healthy, natural plants are going to be the best in the world.

Think I’m kidding?  Try ’em out!  Let me know if you’d like to sample some of doTERRA’S oils. Shoot me an email: gwen.santagate@gmail.com and let me know you’d like to try some out. I’d be happy to share with you and I’ll also let you know how and where you can get them in the cheapest way possible!  (between 25% and 55% OFF retail pricing!)

Alternative Action: Treating Lymphangitis

“Swollen Leg Syndrome” is frustrating, but can be managed successfully.

by Holistic Horse Contributors
ask Holistic Horse

lymph4lateral

Lymphangitis in horse leg

“Swollen Leg Syndrome” is frustrating, but can be managed successfully.

INTRODUCTION

The lymphatics are a type of tubular system that drains excess fluids and proteins from tissue and gradually routes it back into the main blood circulation. Lymphatics are present practically everywhere in the body, but the most common place to encounter problems is in the legs of the horse.

Fluid in the lymphatics is dependent on movement, muscle contraction and pulsation of the blood vessels to keep it moving in the right direction. In some horses, standing idle for prolonged periods can lead to edema or swelling of the legs, often due to leakage of fluid from the lymphatics.

Some horses end up with chronic problems leading to intermittent stocking up or edema formation. As a veterinarian, I believe that managing the ongoing inflammatory process is critical for overall success. Through a combination approach, we can manage ongoing inflammation and modulate the immune response, which I feel is a major component to these conditions. — Tom Schell, DVM, www.curost.com

 

 lymphangitisillustration-rebeckablenntoft

THE EQUINE LYMPHATIC SYSTEM

Modern methods of keeping horses stabled, with limited time for free exercise and concentrated physical training sessions, create an unnatural pattern of movement. When a horse is standing still, the transport capacity of the lymphatic system decreases significantly. Both the velocity of flow and the total volume of lymph being moved will be reduced, putting the standing horse at a distinct disadvantage with regard to recovery from injury or exertion. The horse’s high number of lymph nodes (roughly 8000 compared to an average of 600 in the human) provides a greater propensity for lymphatic “bottlenecks” because lymphatic fluid slows down and concentrates upon entering each lymph node.

Notably, half of the horse’s 8000 lymph nodes are situated in the ascending colon. When access to ad lib forage is restricted, the horse’s lymphatic system is significantly compromised, as the lymph flow around the intestines is stimulated by the peristaltic action created from a continuous flow of food though the gut.

It is not unusual to see performance horses in their boxes almost permanently during the competitive season. A ration of hay or haylage given in the evening can be eaten up within a few hours, leaving the horse standing without food for up to 12 hours. The horse is then taken out for training exercise, whereby his lymphatic system is being asked to increase lymph flow from a compromised position very rapidly into a highly active state. Often horses are then returned to their stable still warm, and although the lymphatic system still has work to do in clearing cellular debris plus dealing with the consequential increase of arterial blood flow into the interstitium, it is not able to do so due to the return to inactivity.

It is therefore not surprising that many performance horses will develop swollen or filled legs as a result of lymphatic compromise. Many owners will try to reduce swelling by using elasticated stable bandages over some form of padding. However, this has been shown to simply transfer the edema via the superficial lymphatic system higher up the leg, where it gives the illusion of having dispersed. In 2006, a large veterinary study was undertaken in Germany to ascertain the effect of different types of bandaging on the lymphatic vessels. This involved injecting a continuous stream of contrast medium (dye) into the lymphatic vessels of horses under sedation and x-raying the effects. Horses bandaged with the elasticated stable bandages were found to have significantly impeded lymph flow when compared to those bandaged with specially designed lymphaticcompression bandages .

When one considers that every cell in the body relies upon receiving dissolved oxygen and nutrients from the interstitium to carry out its metabolic function properly, and that the lymphatic system collects cellular debris from the interstitium to filter and return it to the bloodstream, any disruption of the smooth functioning of the lymphatics will compromise cellular health. When the lymphatics are compromised (either by lack of movement, genetic predisposition, injury, surgery or post infection, such as in cases of lymphangitis), excess fluid within the interstitium will generally lead to edema forming ventrally to the abdomen, mammary glands or sheath, or distally to the limbs.

In horses, hind limbs will generally be more affected than front limbs due to the distance that the lymphatic fluid has to travel back along the thoracic duct to the superficial cervical lymph nodes and external jugular veins.

“Equine Lymphatic System”

Superficial Lymphatic Drainage Pathways of the Horse

Colored areas indicate skin territories, where lymph drains to a set of nodes within that territory. For example, territory III drains to the superficial cervical nodes shown as Lcs in the neck. If a horse has an injury to his lower foreleg, the lymph will drain upwards to that set of nodes. If a horse has an injury behind the ear, it will drain to the same nodes. The territories usually don’t allow lymph from one territory to another, but “watersheds” between them can allow lymph to pass if one area is overloaded. The white line shown running along the center of the spine and ventrally along the abdomen are absolute watersheds, and lymph cannot pass at all through those.

It’s important to note that the internal organs, bones, tendons and ligaments in each territory drain via the deep lymphatics to those same nodes. So the skin of territory I goes to the submandibular nodes under the jowl, but the teeth, bones, tongue, cartilage, etc. in territory I also drain to the submandibular. From there, the collected lymph goes back to the return point to the superficial cervical nodes (Lcs on the diagram). — Rebecka Blenntoft, blenntoftmld.com

LASER THERAPY

Therapeutic laser is used in human medicine to reduce the pain and swelling caused by edema in the lymphatics of the upper limbs, breast and neck, and it can effectively treat lymphangitis in our equine patients as well. Laser treatments modify the viscosity of the lymph, which helps the fluid to move more easily through the lymphatics.  It also softens the hard, fibrotic tissue which can provide a reduction in the volume of the edema in the limb, improving movement and flexibility. In addition to treating the bacterial infection, you can use the laser twice daily to treat the condition, delivering 3 joules/cm2 over all affected areas. You should also treat the lymph structures outside of the swollen tissue that are responsible for removing the fluid through the limbs. If the epidermis has become irritated and formed a crusty covering, reduce the dosage to 2 joules/cm2 around the crusted portion and maintain 3 joules in the remaining areas. Treating with the laser early in the process is recommended to reduce the fibrosis which can occur. There are no reported side effects from using laser treatment for this condition, and improvement is easy to measure and track. — Doreen Hudson,www.respondsystems.com

ESSENTIAL OILS

Essential oils are very effective in supporting the lymphatic system as they can improve the function of the circulatory system, aid in cellular detoxification and combat infection congruently. Cypress oil does all of these, reduces muscles spasms and nervous tension, and aids in digestion, making it a perfect oil for the barn. Other oil recommendations are Lemon and Grapefruit which most horses will lick right out of your hand. — Nan E. Martin, LSH-CRTS

HERBS

Robust immune and elimination systems should actively and positively discharge waste products of infection and inflammation. Lymphangitis is simply the result of this process not working efficiently. Less robust systems will try to function with a toxic load in the blood. Blood Cleanser Herbs include: Garlic, Elecampane, Echinacea, Nettle, Maritime Pine, Yarrow, Kelp, Violet Leaves, Horseradish, Horsetail, Red Clover and Rosehips along with the Bach Flowers Crab Apple and Rescue Remedy. A 12-week course is recommended, which is a full blood cycle. Adding Fenugreek and Rosehips to the feed as basic addition will ensure that the lymphatic system is well supported, as are kidneys. — Catherine McDowell, Herbalist

Herbal blends can help support your horse’s recovery from lymphangitis. Cleavers, calendula, fenugreek, violet leaves, and kelp aid your horse by stimulating the lymphatic system. Other herbs such as Echinacea help clear infection, while dandelion root and nettles help to drain the excess fluid. For anti-inflammatory and pain relief, devil’s claw or meadowsweet are good choices. Adding an herb that helps to balance immune function such as American Ginseng or another adaptogen would be beneficial. — Andrea Baldwin, Herbalist

HOMEOPATHY

Apis is a great homeopathic remedy for many cases of lymphangitis. The keynote for the use of the remedy Apis is significant swelling with lots of fluid under the skin, and the skin stretched tightly over the swelling, very similar as what a bee sting looks like. Lymphangitis creates a similar sort of swelling, where the skin becomes stretched over the fluid-filled leg. — Joyce Harman, DVM, MRCVS

KINESIOLOGY TAPE

Using kinesiology tape in Lymphangitis cases can be quite effective if you follow the correct protocols. The goal is to move collected fluid (blood flow and lymph) out of the affected area to reduce swelling (lymphadema). It is important to begin taping only after the initial infection is under control. — Dr. Beverly Gordon, www.Equi-Tape.com

ACUPRESSURE

Because there are three different types of lymphangitis (sporadic, ulcerative, and epizootic), varying in degrees of severity, follow the recommendations of your holistic veterinarian along with the acupressure session “Benefiting Lymphangitis”.

This session will help improve circulation, remove toxins, and reduce inflammation associated with this condition. — Amy Snow and Nancy Zidonis

MANUAL LYMPH DRAINAGE

Manual lymph drainage (MLD) is a light, painless therapy utilizing the power of the lymphatic system to treat a wide variety of conditions. MLD is able to move fluid from a region where the system isn’t functioning to one where it is. Very precise manual movements encourage tissue fluid to enter the initial lymph vessels and stimulate lymphatic contraction, greatly increasing the movement of lymph through the system. MLD is literally skin deep, working primarily with the superficial lymphatics. — Heather Powell, equinemld.com

 

What are Essential Oils?

National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy

Essential Oils Lavendar
Aromatherapy is an incredibly vast and rich field.

Essential Oils Defined

The term “essential oil” is a contraction of the original “quintessential oil.” This stems from the Aristotelian idea that matter is composed of four elements, namely, fire, air, earth, and water. The fifth element, or quintessence, was then considered to be spirit or life force. Distillation and evaporation were thought to be processes of removing the spirit from the plant and this is also reflected in our language since the term “spirits” is used to describe distilled alcoholic beverages such as brandy, whiskey, and eau de vie. The last of these again shows reference to the concept of removing the life force from the plant. Nowadays, of course, we know that, far from being spirit, essential oils are physical in nature and composed of complex mixtures of chemicals.1

The International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in their Vocabulary of Natural Materials (ISO/D1S9235.2) defines an essential oil as a product made by distillation with either water or steam or by mechanical processing of citrus rinds or by dry distillation of natural materials. Following the distillation, the essential oil is physically separated from the water phase.

According to Dr. Brian Lawrence “for an essential oil to be a true essential oil, it must be isolated by physical means only. The physical methods used are distillation (steam, steam/water and water) or expression (also known as cold pressing, a unique feature for citrus peel oils). There is one other method of oil isolation specific to a very limited number of essential oil plants. This is a maceration/distillation. In the process, the plant material is macerated in warm water to release the enzyme-bound essential oil. Examples of oils produced by maceration are onion, garlic, wintergreen, bitter almond, etc.”.2

NAHA explores different methods of extracting essential oils here.

For now, lets explore the biological role of essential oils within aromatic and medicinal plants.

The Biological Role Of Essential Oils Within Plants

While essential oils are in the plant, they are constantly changing their chemical composition, helping the plant to adapt to the ever-changing internal and external environment. Recent scientific research has shown that plants produce essential oils for a variety of purposes including:

To attract pollinators and dispersal agents
Insects have been pollinating flowers for over 200 million years. Insects, like humans, are attracted to specific plants for one of three possible reasons: its aroma, its color, or its morphology or physical structure. Scent appears to be more ancient than flower color as an attractant to insects.3 Various insects, including bees, butterflies, and even beetles, are known to be attracted by the aroma of a plant.4

To play a role in allelopathy, a type of plant-to-plant competition
Allelopathy occurs when a plant releases chemicals to prevent competing vegetation from growing within its area or zone. An often-cited example is in southern California, home to the dominant shrubs Salvia leucophylla (sage bush) and Artemisia californica (a type of sage). Both species release allelopathic terpenoids, eucalyptol and camphor, into the surrounding area, which effectively prevents other plant species from growing around them. This is allelopathy. Chemicals that deter competing growth (terpenes, for example) are referred to as allelochemics.

To serve as defense compounds against insects and other animals
Plants, like other living things, need to protect themselves from various types of predators. Plants use terpenoid compounds to deter insects and other animals from approaching them. Shawe pointed out that “insects are very rarely found on peppermint plants and the presence of linalol in the peel of citrus fruits confers resistance to attack by the Caribbean fruit fly.”5 The Douglas fir tree releases a complex mixture of volatile oils, or terpenes, from their needles to defend against the spruce budworm. Even more fascinating is that the Douglas fir trees “will vary the composition and production of terpenes each year thus decreasing the ability of the budworm to develop widespread immunity to specific compounds.6

To protect the plant by their antifungal and antibacterial nature
Resins and complex combinations of terpenes are released by some plants and trees, such as evergreens, to act as antimicrobial, antifungal, and antibacterial agents against a wide range of organisms that may threaten the survival of the plants. Compounds such as sesquiterpene lactones found in plants such as feverfew, yarrow, and blessed thistle, have been found to play a strong antimicrobial role as well as a protective role from herbivores.

The Storage Of Essential Oil Within The Plant

Plants store essential oils either in external secretory structures, which are found on the surface of the plant, or internal secretory structures, which are found inside the plant material. Usually with plants having external secretory structure, you just have to lightly touch them and you will notice an aroma imparted to your skin. With plants having internal secretory structures, you may need to break the leaf or seed in order to get to the aroma/essential oil.

External Secretory Structures

Glandular trichomes
External secretory structures in plants are called glandular trichomes. They can be found on the surface of the plant (such as herbaceous leaves) and are thought to be responsible for the production of chemicals that deter or attract pests or pollinators. Glandular trichomes are most commonly found in the Lamiaceae (syn. Labiatae) family. The oil storage capacity varies from species to species and also between trichomes. Biochemical experiments have shown that these volatile oils are synthesized by highly refined enzyme reactions taking place within the plant.

Common essential oils that have glandular trichomes: Basil, Lavender, Marjoram, Melissa, Oregano, Peppermint, Rosemary, and Spearmint

Internal Secretory Structures

Secretory cavities and ducts
Secretory cavities and ducts consist of large, intercellular spaces that are formed either by the separation of the walls of neighboring cells, or by the disintegration of cells.7 Cavities occur as spherical spaces and are most commonly found in the Myrtaceae and Rutaceae families. Ducts are more elongated spaces and are most commonly seen in the Asteraceae (syn. Compositae), Pinaceae, Apiaceae (syn. Umbelliferae), and Coniferae families.

Common essential oils with secretory cavities:
Citrus oils: Bergamot, Grapefruit, Lemon, Lime, Orange, and Tangerine; Eucalyptus species; Clove bud; and Resin trees: Benzoin, Frankincense, and Myrrh

Common essential oils with secretory ducts: Angelica, Caraway, Carrot seed, Dill, Fennel, Fir, Cedar, Pine, Spruce, Juniper, and Cypress

Essential oil cells

Essential oil cells are found within the plant tissue and are unique from other cells in content and size. They can often be found throughout the plant and are most commonly seen in the Lauraceae, Piperaceae, Gramineae, and Zingiberaceae families.

Common essential oils with cells: Bay Laurel, Black pepper, Cardamom, Cinnamon, Citronella, Ginger, Lemongrass, Nutmeg, Palmarosa, and Patchouli


References

1 Sell, Charles. (2010). Chapter 5: The Chemistry of Essential Oils. (Can Baser K H, and Buchbauer G. Editors) in the bookHandbook of essential oils : science, technology, and applications, (pp. 121-150). Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, Taylor & Francis Group.
2 Lawrence, B. (2000). Essential Oils: From Agriculture to Chemistry. NAHA’s World of Aromatherapy III Conference Proceedings, pp. 8–26.
3 Shawe, K. (1996). The Biological Role of Essential Oils, Aromatherapy Quarterly, 50, 23-27.
4 IBID.
5 Shawe, K. (1996). The Biological Role of Essential Oils, Aromatherapy Quarterly, 50, 23-27.
6 Buhner, S. (2002). The Lost Language of Plants. White River Junction, Vermont: Chelsea Green Publishing.
7 Svoboda, K. (1996). The Biology of Fragrance. Aromatherapy Quarterly, 49, 25-28.

All photos by © Power & Syred